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  The time course of speaker-specific language processing

Kroczek, L. O., & Gunter, T. C. (2021). The time course of speaker-specific language processing. Cortex, 141, 311-321. doi:10.1016/j.cortex.2021.04.017.

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Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Kroczek, Leon O.H.1, Author
Gunter, Thomas C.2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Regensburg, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              

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Free keywords: Speaker identity; Language use; Syntax; Prediction; ERP
 Abstract: Listeners are sensitive to a speaker’s individual language use and generate expectations for particular speakers. It is unclear, however, how such expectations affect online language processing. In the present EEG study, we presented thirty-two participants with auditory sentence stimuli of two speakers. Speakers differed in their use of two particular syntactic structures, easy subject-initial SOV structures and more difficult object-initial OSV structures. One speaker, the SOV-Speaker, had a high proportion of SOV sentences (75%) and a low proportion of OSV sentences (25%), and vice-versa for the OSV-Speaker. Participants were exposed to the speakers’ individual language use in a training session followed by a test session on the consecutive day. ERP-results show that early stages of sentence processing are driven by syntactic processing only and are unaffected by speaker-specific expectations. In a late stage, however, an interaction between speaker and syntax information was observed. For the SOV-Speaker condition, the classical P600-effect reflected the effort of processing difficult and unexpected sentence structures. For the OSV-Speaker condition, both structures elicited different responses on frontal electrodes, possibly indexing effort to switch from a local speaker model to a global model of language use. Overall, the study identifies distinct neural mechanisms related to speaker-specific expectations.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-04-272020-09-172021-04-272021-05-172021-08
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.cortex.2021.04.017
Other: epub 2021
PMID: 34118750
 Degree: -

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Title: Cortex
  Other : Cortex
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Milan [etc.] : Elsevier Masson SAS
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 141 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 311 - 321 Identifier: ISSN: 0010-9452
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925393344