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  A photosynthesis operon in the chloroplast genome drives speciation in evening primroses

Zupok, A., Kozul, D., Schöttler, M. A., Niehörster, J., Garbsch, F., Liere, K., et al. (2021). A photosynthesis operon in the chloroplast genome drives speciation in evening primroses. The Plant Cell, 33(8), 2583-2601. doi:10.1093/plcell/koab155.

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 Creators:
Zupok, A.1, Author              
Kozul, D.1, Author              
Schöttler, M. A.2, Author              
Niehörster, J.1, Author              
Garbsch, F.1, Author              
Liere, Karsten3, Author
Fischer, A.1, Author              
Zoschke, R.4, Author              
Malinova, I.1, Author              
Bock, R.5, Author              
Greiner, S.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Cytoplasmic and Evolutionary Genetics, Department Bock, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Max Planck Society, ou_1753324              
2Photosynthesis Research, Department Bock, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Max Planck Society, ou_1753323              
3external, ou_persistent22              
4Translational Regulation in Plants, Department Bock, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Max Planck Society, ou_2324691              
5Organelle Biology and Biotechnology, Department Bock, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Max Planck Society, ou_1753326              

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 Abstract: Genetic incompatibility between the cytoplasm and the nucleus is thought to be a major factor in species formation, but mechanistic understanding of this process is poor. In evening primroses (Oenothera spp.), a model plant for organelle genetics and population biology, hybrid offspring regularly display chloroplast-nuclear incompatibility. This usually manifests in bleached plants, more rarely in hybrid sterility. Hence, most of these incompatibilities affect photosynthetic capability, a trait that is under selection in changing environments. Here we show that light-dependent misregulation of the plastid psbB operon, which encodes core subunits of photosystem II and the cytochrome b6f complex, can lead to hybrid incompatibility, and this ultimately drives speciation. This misregulation causes an impaired light acclimation response in incompatible plants. Moreover, as a result of their different chloroplast genotypes, the parental lines differ in photosynthesis performance upon exposure to different light conditions. Significantly, the incompatible chloroplast genome is naturally found in xeric habitats with high light intensities, whereas the compatible one is limited to mesic habitats. Consequently, our data raise the possibility that the hybridization barrier evolved as a result of adaptation to specific climatic conditions.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-06-07
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1093/plcell/koab155
 Degree: -

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Title: The Plant Cell
  Abbreviation : Plant C
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Rockville : American Society of Plant Physiologists
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 33 (8) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 2583 - 2601 Identifier: ISSN: 1532-298X
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1532-298X