English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  High-salt diet suppresses autoimmune demyelination by regulating the blood-brain barrier permeability

Na, S.-J., Janakiraman, M., Leliavski, A., & Krishnamoorthy, G. (2021). High-salt diet suppresses autoimmune demyelination by regulating the blood-brain barrier permeability. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 118(12): e2025944118. doi:10.1073/pnas.2025944118.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
e2025944118.full.pdf (Publisher version), 2MB
Name:
e2025944118.full.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
© 2021 the Author(s).

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Na, Shin-Joung1, Author              
Janakiraman, Mathangi1, Author              
Leliavski, Alexei1, Author              
Krishnamoorthy, Gurumoorthy1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Krishnamoorthy, Gurumoorthy / Neuroinflammation and Mucosal Immunology, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_2173635              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Science & Technology - Other Topics; multiple sclerosis; dietary salt; experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis;
 Abstract: Sodium chloride, "salt," is an essential component of daily food and vitally contributes to the body's homeostasis. However, excessive salt intake has often been held responsible for numerous health risks associated with the cardiovascular system and kidney. Recent reports linked a high-salt diet (HSD) to the exacerbation of artificially induced central nervous system (CNS) autoimmune pathology through changes in microbiota and enhanced T(H)17 cell differentiation [M. Kleinewietfeld et al., Nature 496, 518-522 (2013); C. Wu et al., Nature 496, 513-517 (2013); N. Wilck et al., Nature 551, 585-589 (2017)]. However, there is no evidence that dietary salt promotes or worsens a spontaneous autoimmune disease. Here we show that HSD suppresses autoimmune disease development in a mouse model of spontaneous CNS autoimmunity. We found that HSD consumption increased the circulating serum levels of the glucocorticoid hormone corticosterone. Corticosterone enhanced the expression of tight junction molecules on the brain endothelial cells and promoted the tightening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) thereby controlling the entry of inflammatory T cells into the CNS. Our results demonstrate the multifaceted and potentially beneficial effects of moderately increased salt consumption in CNS autoimmunity.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: 8
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: We thank the Mass Spectrometry and NGS Core Facilities at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry for performing sample analysis for proteomics and mRNA-seq experiments.
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: ISI: 000631868600076
DOI: 10.1073/pnas.2025944118
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show hide
Project name : Starting Grant (GAMES; 635617)
Grant ID : 635617
Funding program : -
Funding organization : European Research Council
Project name : Grant SFB TR-128 (Project A1)
Grant ID : -
Funding program : -
Funding organization : German Research Foundation (DFG)

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  Other : PNAS
  Other : Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA
  Abbreviation : Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A.
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Washington, D.C. : National Academy of Sciences
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 118 (12) Sequence Number: e2025944118 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 0027-8424
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925427230