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  Discovery of novel herpes simplexviruses in wild gorillas, bonobos, and chimpanzees supports zoonotic origin of HSV-2

Wertheim, J. O., Hostager, R., Ryu, D., Merkel, K., Angedakin, S., Arandjelovic, M., et al. (2021). Discovery of novel herpes simplexviruses in wild gorillas, bonobos, and chimpanzees supports zoonotic origin of HSV-2. Molecular Biology and Evolution, 38(7), 2818-2830. doi:10.1093/molbev/msab072.

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This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@oup.com
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 Creators:
Wertheim, Joel O., Author
Hostager, Reilly, Author
Ryu, Diane, Author
Merkel, Kevin, Author
Angedakin, Samuel1, Author              
Arandjelovic, Mimi2, Author              
Ayimisin, Ayuk Emmanuel1, Author              
Babweteera, Fred, Author
Bessone, Mattia1, Author              
Brun-Jeffery, Kathryn J., Author
Dieguez, Paula1, Author              
Eckardt, Winnie, Author
Fruth, Barbara3, Author              
Herbinger, Ilka, Author
Jones, Sorrel1, Author              
Kuehl, Hjalmar4, Author              
Langergraber, Kevin E., Author
Lee, Kevin1, Author              
Madinda, Nadege Freda1, Author              
Metzger, Sonja2, Author              
Ormsby, Lucy Jayne1, Author              Robbins, Martha M.5, Author              Sommer, Volker, AuthorStoinski, Tara, AuthorWessling, Erin G., AuthorWittig, Roman M.2, 6, Author              Yuh, Yisa Ginath1, Author              Leendertz, Fabian H., AuthorCalvignac-Spencer, Sébastien, Author more..
Affiliations:
1Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society, ou_1497674              
2Chimpanzees, Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society, ou_2149636              
3ou_persistent22, ou_persistent22              
4Great Ape Evolutionary Ecology and Conservation, Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society, ou_2149638              
5Gorillas, Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society, ou_2149637              
6Department of Human Behavior Ecology and Culture, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig, DE, ou_2173689              

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 Abstract: Viruses closely related to human pathogens can reveal the origins of human infectious diseases. Human herpes simplexvirus type 1 (HSV-1) and type 2 (HSV-2) are hypothesized to have arisen via host-virus codivergence and cross-species transmission. We report the discovery of novel herpes simplexviruses during a large-scale screening of fecal samples from wild gorillas, bonobos, and chimpanzees. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that, contrary to expectation, simplexviruses from these African apes are all more closely related to HSV-2 than to HSV-1. Molecular clock-based hypothesis testing suggests the divergence between HSV-1 and the African great ape simplexviruses likely represents a codivergence event between humans and gorillas. The simplexviruses infecting African great apes subsequently experienced multiple cross-species transmission events over the past 3 My, the most recent of which occurred between humans and bonobos around 1 Ma. These findings revise our understanding of the origins of human herpes simplexviruses and suggest that HSV-2 is one of the earliest zoonotic pathogens.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-03-152021-07-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1093/molbev/msab072
 Degree: -

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Title: Molecular Biology and Evolution
  Other : Mol. Biol. Evol.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Oxford : Oxford University Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 38 (7) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 2818 - 2830 Identifier: ISSN: 0737-4038
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925536119