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  Food Sharing across borders: First observation of inter-community meat sharing by bonobos at LuiKotale, DRC

Fruth, B., & Hohmann, G. (2018). Food Sharing across borders: First observation of inter-community meat sharing by bonobos at LuiKotale, DRC. Human Nature, 29(2), 91-103. doi:10.1007/s12110-018-9311-9.

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Fruth_Food_HumNat_2018.pdf (Publisher version), 3MB
 
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Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and repro- duction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

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 Creators:
Fruth, Barbara1, Author              
Hohmann, Gottfried2, Author              
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1External Organizations, ou_persistent22              
2Bonobos, Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society, ou_2149635              

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Free keywords: Food sharing Intercommunity encounters Bonobo Pan paniscus Human evolution
 Abstract: Evolutionary models consider hunting and food sharing to be milestones that paved the way from primate to human societies. Because fossil evidence is scarce, hominoid primates serve as referential models to assess our common ancestors’ capacity in terms of communal use of resources, food sharing, and other forms of cooperation. Whereas chimpanzees form male-male bonds exhibiting resource-defense polygyny with intolerance and aggression toward nonresidents, bonobos form male-female and female-female bonds resulting in relaxed relations with neighboring groups. Here we report the first known case of meat sharing between members of two bonobo communities, revealing a new dimension of social tolerance in this species. This observation testifies to the behavioral plasticity that exists in the two Pan species and contributes to scenarios concerning the traits of the last common ancestor of Pan and Homo. It also contributes to the discussion of physiological triggers of in-group/out-group behavior and allows reconsideration of the emergence of social norms in prehuman societies.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 20182018-04-052018-06
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 13
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1007/s12110-018-9311-9
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Title: Human Nature
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Hawthorne, N.Y. : Aldine de Gruyter
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 29 (2) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 91 - 103 Identifier: ISSN: 1045-6767
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925591428