English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Brain networks involved in the influence of religion on empathy in male Vietnam War veterans

Cristofori, I., Zhong, W., Cohen-Zimerman, S., Bulbulia, J., Gordon, B., Krueger, F., et al. (2021). Brain networks involved in the influence of religion on empathy in male Vietnam War veterans. Scientific Reports, 11(1): 11047. doi:10.1038/s41598-021-90481-3.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
shh2963.pdf (Publisher version), 2MB
Name:
shh2963.pdf
Description:
OA
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Cristofori, Irene, Author
Zhong, Wanting, Author
Cohen-Zimerman, Shira, Author
Bulbulia, Joseph1, Author              
Gordon, Barry, Author
Krueger, Frank, Author
Grafman, Jordan, Author
Affiliations:
1Linguistic and Cultural Evolution, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074311              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Emotion, Social behaviour, Social neuroscience
 Abstract: Humans all over the world believe in spirits and deities, yet how the brain supports religious cognition remains unclear. Drawing on a unique sample of patients with penetrating traumatic brain injuries (pTBI) and matched healthy controls (HCs) we investigate dependencies of religious cognition on neural networks that represent (1) others agents’ intentions (Theory of Mind, ToM) and (2) other agents’ feelings (Empathy). Extending previous observations that ToM networks are recruited during prayer, we find that people with vmPFC damage report higher scores on the personal relationship with God inventory even when they are not praying. This result offers evidence that it is the modulation of ToM networks that support beliefs in supernatural agents. With respect to empathetic processing, we observed that vmPFC and pSTS/TPJ lesions mediated by the strength of the personal relationship with God affect empathetic responses. We suggest that the neurological networks underpinning God representations amplify human empathetic responses. The cultural evolutionary study of religion has argued that supernatural beliefs evoke pro-social responses because people fear the wrath of Gods. Our findings imply greater attention should be paid to the mechanisms by which religious cognition may regulate empathetic responses to others.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-05-26
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: 13
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: Results
- Descriptive statistic results.
- Group analysis.
- Correlation analyses.
- Mediation analysis.
Discussion
Materials and methods
- Participants.
- CT acquisition and analysis.
- Neuropsychological testing.
- Statistical analyses.
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1038/s41598-021-90481-3
Other: shh2963
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Scientific Reports
  Abbreviation : Sci. Rep.
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: London, UK : Nature Publishing Group
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 11 (1) Sequence Number: 11047 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2045-2322
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2045-2322