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  3000-year-old shark attack victim from Tsukumo shell-mound, Okayama, Japan

White, J. A., Burgess, G. H., Nakatsukasa, M., Hudson, M., Pouncett, J., Kusaka, S., et al. (2021). 3000-year-old shark attack victim from Tsukumo shell-mound, Okayama, Japan. Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, 38: 103065. doi:10.1016/j.jasrep.2021.103065.

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Supplementary information 1. (Supplementary material)
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available in the institutes network. - doc. - (last seen: July 2021)
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 Creators:
White, J. Alyssa, Author
Burgess, George H., Author
Nakatsukasa, Masato, Author
Hudson, Mark1, Author           
Pouncett, John, Author
Kusaka, Soichiro, Author
Yoneda, Minoru, Author
Yamada, Yasuhiro, Author
Schulting, Rick J., Author
Affiliations:
1Eurasia3angle, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2301699              

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Free keywords: Shark attack, Trauma, Radiocarbon, 3D, GIS
 Abstract: Modern shark attacks are uncommon and archaeological examples are even rarer, with the oldest previously known case dating to ca. AD 1000. Here we report a shark attack on an adult male radiocarbon dated to 1370–1010 cal BC during the fisher-hunter-gatherer Jōmon period of the Japanese archipelago. The individual was buried at the Tsukumo site near Japan’s Seto Inland Sea, where modern shark attacks have been reported. The victim has at least 790 perimortem traumatic lesions characteristic of a shark attack, including deep, incised bone gouges, punctures, cuts with overlapping striations and perimortem blunt force fractures. Lesions were mapped onto a 3D model of the human skeleton using a Geographical Information System to assist visualisation and analysis of the injuries. The distribution of wounds suggests the victim was probably alive at the time of attack rather than scavenged. The most likely species of shark responsible for the attack is either a white shark (Carcharodon carcharias) or a tiger shark (Galeocerdo cuvier). Shortly after the attack most, though not all, of his body was recovered and buried in the Tsukumo cemetery.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-06-232021-08
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 12
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: 1. Introduction
2. Background
2.1. Site details
2.2. Jōmon period sharks
2.3. Shark attacks
2.4. Modern shark attacks in Japan
3. Methods
4. Tsukumo Shell-mound Individual No. 24
4.1. Types of injuries present
5. Patterns of injury
5.1. Evaluation of shark species
6. Conclusions
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.jasrep.2021.103065
Other: shh2986
 Degree: -

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Project name : Eurasia3angle
Grant ID : 646612
Funding program : Horizon 2020 (H2020)
Funding organization : European Commission (EC)

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Title: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Amsterdam [u.a.] : Elsevier
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 38 Sequence Number: 103065 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2352-409X
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2352-409X