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  Dissociable contributions of frontal and temporal brain regions to basic semantic composition

Graessner, A., Zaccarella, E., Friederici, A. D., Obrig, H., & Hartwigsen, G. (2021). Dissociable contributions of frontal and temporal brain regions to basic semantic composition. Brain Communications, 3(2): fcab090. doi:10.1093/braincomms/fcab090.

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Graessner_Zaccarella_2021.pdf (Publisher version), 587KB
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 Creators:
Graessner, Astrid1, 2, Author           
Zaccarella, Emiliano2, Author           
Friederici, Angela D.2, Author           
Obrig, Hellmuth3, 4, Author           
Hartwigsen, Gesa1, 2, Author           
Affiliations:
1Lise Meitner Research Group Cognition and Plasticity, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_3025665              
2Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, Leipzig, DE, ou_634551              
3Clinic for Cognitive Neurology, University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, Leipzig, DE, ou_634549              

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Free keywords: Meaning composition; Lesion-behaviour mapping; SVR-LSM
 Abstract: Semantic composition is the ability to combine single words to form complex meanings and is an essential component for successful communication. Evidence from neuroimaging studies suggests that semantic composition engages a widely distributed left-hemispheric network, including the anterior temporal lobe, the inferior frontal gyrus and the angular gyrus. To date, the functional relevance of these regions remains unclear. Here, we investigate the impact of lesions to key regions in the semantic network on basic semantic composition. We conducted a multivariate lesion-behaviour mapping study in 36 native German speaking participants with chronic lesions to the language network after left-hemispheric stroke. During the experiment, participants performed a plausibility judgement task on auditorily presented adjective-noun phrases that were either meaningful (‘anxious horse’), anomalous (‘anxious salad’) or had the noun replaced by a pseudoword (‘anxious gufel’), as well as a single-word control condition (‘horse’). We observed that reduced accuracy for anomalous phrases is associated with lesions in left anterior inferior frontal gyrus, whereas increased reaction times for anomalous phrases correlates with lesions in anterior-to-mid temporal lobe. These results indicate that anterior inferior frontal gyrus is relevant for accurate semantic decisions, while anterior-to-mid temporal lobe lesions lead to slowing of the decision for anomalous two-word phrases. These differential effects of lesion location support the notion that anterior inferior frontal gyrus affords executive control for decisions on semantic composition while anterior-to-mid temporal lobe lesions slow the semantic processing of the individual constituents of the phrase.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-03-162020-12-012021-04-082021-04-23
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1093/braincomms/fcab090
Other: ecollection 2021
PMID: 34159319
PMC: PMC8212833
 Degree: -

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Title: Brain Communications
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Oxford : Oxford University Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 3 (2) Sequence Number: fcab090 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2632-1297
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2632-1297