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  Advanced materials design based on waste wood and bark

Wenig, C., Dunlop, J. W. C., Hehemeyer-Cürten, J., Reppe, F., Horbelt, N., Krauthausen, K., et al. (2021). Advanced materials design based on waste wood and bark. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences, 379(2206): 20200345. doi:10.1098/rsta.2020.0345.

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 Creators:
Wenig, Charlett1, Author           
Dunlop, John W. C., Author
Hehemeyer-Cürten, Johanna1, Author           
Reppe, Friedrich1, Author           
Horbelt, Nils1, Author           
Krauthausen, Karin, Author
Fratzl, Peter2, Author           
Eder, Michaela1, Author           
Affiliations:
1Michaela Eder, Biomaterialien, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society, ou_1863293              
2Peter Fratzl, Biomaterialien, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society, ou_1863294              

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Free keywords: weaving, cellulose, waste material, fibre, forest residues
 Abstract: Trees belong to the largest living organisms on Earth and plants in general are one of our main renewable resources. Wood as a material has been used since the beginning of humankind. Today, forestry still provides raw materials for a variety of applications, for example in the building industry, in paper manufacturing and for various wood products. However, many parts of the tree, such as reaction wood, branches and bark are often discarded as forestry residues and waste wood, used as additives in composite materials or burned for energy production. More advanced uses of bark include the extraction of chemical substances for glues, food additives or healthcare, as well as the transformation to advanced carbon materials. Here, we argue that a proper understanding of the internal fibrous structure and the resulting mechanical behaviour of these forest residues allows for the design of materials with greatly varying properties and applications. We show that simple and cheap treatments can give tree bark a leather-like appearance that can be used for the construction of shelters and even the fabrication of woven textiles. This article is part of the theme issue ‘Bio-derived and bioinspired sustainable advanced materials for emerging technologies (part 1)’.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-08-022021
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1098/rsta.2020.0345
BibTex Citekey: doi:10.1098/rsta.2020.0345
PMID: 0615
Other: M:\BM-Publications\2021\WenigPhilTransA_AdvancedMaterialsDesign
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Title: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences
  Abbreviation : Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London : Royal Society
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 379 (2206) Sequence Number: 20200345 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1364-503X