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  Collagen fingerprinting traces the introduction of caprines to island Eastern Africa

Culley, C., Janzen, A., Brown, S., Prendergast, M. E., Wolfhagen, J., Abderemane, B., et al. (2021). Collagen fingerprinting traces the introduction of caprines to island Eastern Africa. Royal Society Open Science, 8(7): 202341. doi:10.1098/rsos.202341.

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(last seen: August 2021)

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 Creators:
Culley, Courtney1, Author              
Janzen, Anneke1, Author              
Brown, Samantha2, Author              
Prendergast, Mary E., Author
Wolfhagen, Jesse1, Author              
Abderemane, Bourhane, Author
Ali, Abdallah K., Author
Haji, Othman, Author
Horton, Mark C., Author
Shipton, Ceri, Author
Swift, Jillian1, Author              
Tabibou, Tabibou A., Author
Wright, Henry T., Author
Boivin, Nicole1, Author              
Crowther, Alison1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              
2FINDER, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2541700              

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Free keywords: ZooMS, biomolecular archaeology, anthropogenic impacts, zooarchaeology, livestock
 Abstract: The human colonization of eastern Africa's near- and offshore islands was accompanied by the translocation of several domestic, wild and commensal fauna, many of which had long-term impacts on local environments. To better understand the timing and nature of the introduction of domesticated caprines (sheep and goat) to these islands, this study applied collagen peptide fingerprinting (Zooarchaeology by Mass Spectrometry or ZooMS) to archaeological remains from eight Iron Age sites, dating between ca 300 and 1000 CE, in the Zanzibar, Mafia and Comoros archipelagos. Where previous zooarchaeological analyses had identified caprine remains at four of these sites, this study identified goat at seven sites and sheep at three, demonstrating that caprines were more widespread than previously known. The ZooMS results support an introduction of goats to island eastern Africa from at least the seventh century CE, while sheep in our sample arrived one–two centuries later. Goats may have been preferred because, as browsers, they were better adapted to the islands' environments. The results allow for a more accurate understanding of early caprine husbandry in the study region and provide a critical archaeological baseline for examining the potential long-term impacts of translocated fauna on island ecologies.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-07-282021-08
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 18
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: 1. Introduction
2. Background
2.1. Island colonization and species translocations
2.2. Tracing the introduction of caprines to insular Eastern Africa
3. Methods
3.1. Sites
3.2. Sample selection
3.3. ZooMS protocol
3.3.1. Acid-insoluble protocol
3.3.2. Acid-soluble protocol
3.3.3. Lyophilized collagen for stable isotope analysis
3.3.4. C18 clean-up and MALDI-ToF analysis
4. Results
5. Discussion
5.1. Diachronic patterns in the introduction of caprines
5.2. Island herd compositions
5.3. Wild faunal extirpations and translocations
5.4. Long-term ecological impacts of caprines on Eastern Africa’s islands
6. Conclusion
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1098/rsos.202341
Other: shh3003
 Degree: -

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Title: Royal Society Open Science
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London : Royal Society
Pages: 202341 Volume / Issue: 8 (7) Sequence Number: 202341 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2054-5703
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2054-5703