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  Mass-kill hunting and Late Quaternary ecology: New insights into the ‘desert kite’ phenomenon in Arabia

Groucutt, H. S., & Carleton, W. C. (2021). Mass-kill hunting and Late Quaternary ecology: New insights into the ‘desert kite’ phenomenon in Arabia. Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, 37: 102995, pp. 1-10. doi:10.1016/j.jasrep.2021.102995.

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 Creators:
Groucutt, Huw S.1, 2, Author           
Carleton, W. Christopher2, Author           
Affiliations:
1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              
2Max Planck Research Group Extreme Events, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_3262629              

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Free keywords: Stone structures, Hunting, GIS, Remote sensing, Archaeology
 Abstract: Over 6,000 ‘desert kites’—mass-kill stone hunting traps constructed at various times over the last 10,000 years—have been identified from northern Arabia to western central Asia. It has been proposed that kites had a significant impact on animal demography, leading to changes in ecology and human societies. While there has been considerable discussion regarding the function and chronology of kites, their spatial distribution is poorly understood. Here we report over 300 desert kites from several areas of the Arabian Peninsula, including ~ 500 km further south than previously suggested. Using satellite imagery, we studied their super-imposition revealing an extended chronology of kite-construction, including multiple phases of rebuilding in some cases and kites built relatively recently. This shows that desert kites were significantly more spatially and temporally widespread than previously believed, suggesting that they played a role in transforming Late Quaternary ecosystems and offering insights into the behaviour of human societies in challenging environments.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-05-012021-06
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 10
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: 1. Introduction
2. Methods
3. Results
3.1. The distribution and regionalisation of desert kites
3.2. New desert kites in central and northern Arabia
3.3. The desert kites of Harrat Nawasif
3.4. The context and chronology of Harrat Nawasif kites and other stone structures
4. Discussion
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.jasrep.2021.102995
Other: shh2942
 Degree: -

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Title: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Amsterdam [u.a.] : Elsevier
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 37 Sequence Number: 102995 Start / End Page: 1 - 10 Identifier: ISSN: 2352-409X
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2352-409X