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  Stable isotopic evidence for nutrient rejuvenation and long-term resilience on Tikopia Island (Southeast Solomon Islands)

Swift, J. A., Kirch, P. V., Ilgner, J., Brown, S., Lucas, M., Marzo, S., et al. (2021). Stable isotopic evidence for nutrient rejuvenation and long-term resilience on Tikopia Island (Southeast Solomon Islands). Sustainability, 13(15): 8567. doi:10.3390/su13158567.

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 Creators:
Swift, Jillian A., Author
Kirch, Patrick V., Author
Ilgner, Jana1, Author              
Brown, Samantha, Author
Lucas, Mary1, Author              
Marzo, Sara, Author
Roberts, Patrick1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              

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Free keywords: stable isotopes; archaeology; commensals; nutrient flows; Polynesia; land use; ecomimicry
 Abstract: Tikopia Island, a small and relatively isolated Polynesian Outlier in the Southeast Solomon Islands, supports a remarkably dense human population with minimal external support. Examining long-term trends in human land use on Tikopia through archaeological datasets spanning nearly 3000 years presents an opportunity to investigate pathways to long-term sustainability in a tropical island setting. Here, we trace nutrient dynamics across Tikopia’s three pre-European contact phases (Kiki, Sinapupu, Tuakamali) via stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis of commensal Pacific rat (Rattus exulans) and domestic pig (Sus scrofa) bone and tooth dentine collagen. Our results show a decline in δ15N values from the Kiki (c. 800 BC-AD 100) to Sinapupu (c. AD 100–1200) phases, consistent with long-term commensal isotope trends observed on other Polynesian islands. However, increased δ15N coupled with lower δ13C values in the Tuakamali Phase (c. AD 1200–1800) point to a later nutrient rejuvenation, likely tied to dramatic transformations in agriculture and land use at the Sinapupu-Tuakamali transition. This study offers new, quantifiable evidence for deep-time land and resource management decisions on Tikopia and subsequent impacts on island nutrient status and long-term sustainability.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-07-31
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: 19
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: 1. Introduction
2. Materials and Methods
2.1. Sample Selection
2.2. Taxonomic Identification via Zooarchaeology by Mass Spectrometry (ZooMS)
2.3. Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotope Analysis of Bone and Tooth Dentine Collagen
3. Results
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3390/su13158567
Other: shh3016
 Degree: -

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Title: Sustainability
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Basel, Switzerland : MDPI
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 13 (15) Sequence Number: 8567 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2071-1050
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2071-1050