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  Neural correlates of successful memory encoding in kindergarten and early elementary school children: Longitudinal trends and effects of schooling

Nolden, S., Brod, G., Meyer, A.-K., Fandakova, Y., & Shing, Y. L. (2021). Neural correlates of successful memory encoding in kindergarten and early elementary school children: Longitudinal trends and effects of schooling. Cerebral Cortex, 31(8), 3764-3779. doi:10.1093/cercor/bhab046.

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Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Nolden, Sophie1, Author
Brod, Garvin1, 2, 3, Author
Meyer, Ann-Kristin2, 4, Author           
Fandakova, Yana2, Author
Shing, Yee Lee1, 2, Author
Affiliations:
1Department of Psychology, Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Center for Lifespan Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Department of Education and Human Development, Leibniz Institute for Research and Information in Education, Frankfurt, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Max Planck Research Group Adaptive Memory, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_2295691              

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Free keywords: fMRI; Hippocampus; Memory; Prefrontal cortex; Schooling; Subsequent memory effect
 Abstract: From age 5 to 7, there are remarkable improvements in children's cognitive abilities ("5-7 shift"). In many countries, including Germany, formal schooling begins in this age range. It is, thus, unclear to what extent exposure to formal schooling contributes to the "5-7 shift." In this longitudinal study, we investigated if schooling acts as a catalyst of maturation. We tested 5-year-old children who were born close to the official cutoff date for school entry and who were still attending a play-oriented kindergarten. One year later, the children were tested again. Some of the children had experienced their first year of schooling whereas the others had remained in kindergarten. Using 2 functional magnetic resonance imaging tasks that assessed episodic memory formation (i.e., subsequent memory effect), we found that children relied strongly on the medial temporal lobe (MTL) at both time points but not on the prefrontal cortex (PFC). In contrast, older children and adults typically show subsequent memory effects in both MTL and PFC. Both children groups improved in their memory performance, but there were no longitudinal changes nor group differences in neural activation. We conclude that successful memory formation in this age group relies more heavily on the MTL than in older age groups.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-01-282020-07-012021-01-312021-04-242021-08
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1093/cercor/bhab046
PMID: 33895801
 Degree: -

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Project name : -
Grant ID : ERC-2018-StG-PIVOTAL-758898
Funding program : -
Funding organization : European Union
Project name : -
Grant ID : JRF 2018–2020
Funding program : -
Funding organization : Jacobs Foundation

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Title: Cerebral Cortex
Source Genre: Journal
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Affiliations:
Publ. Info: New York, NY : Oxford University Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 31 (8) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 3764 - 3779 Identifier: ISSN: 1047-3211
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925592440