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  A meta-analysis of fMRI studies of semantic cognition in children

Enge, A., Abdel Rahman, R., & Skeide, M. A. (2021). A meta-analysis of fMRI studies of semantic cognition in children. NeuroImage, 241: 118436. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2021.118436.

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 Creators:
Enge, Alexander1, 2, Author
Abdel Rahman, Rasha2, Author
Skeide, Michael A.1, Author           
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Research Group Learning in Early Childhood, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_3340643              
2Department of Psychology, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: fMRI; Semantic cognition; Children; Meta-analysis
 Abstract: Our capacity to derive meaning from things that we see and words that we hear is unparalleled in other animal species and current AI systems. Despite a wealth of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies on where different semantic features are processed in the adult brain, the development of these systems in children is poorly understood. Here we conducted an extensive database search and identified 50 fMRI experiments investigating semantic world knowledge, semantic relatedness judgments, and the differentiation of visual semantic object categories in children (total N = 1,018, mean age = 10.1 years, range 4–15 years). Synthesizing the results of these experiments, we found consistent activation in the bilateral inferior frontal gyri (IFG), fusiform gyri (FG), and supplementary motor areas (SMA), as well as in the left middle and superior temporal gyri (MTG/STG). Within this system, we found little evidence for age-related changes across childhood and high overlap with the adult semantic system. In sum, the identification of these cortical areas provides the starting point for further research on the mechanisms by which the developing brain learns to make sense of its environment.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-07-202021-05-062021-07-272021-07-282021-11-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2021.118436
PMID: 34329724
Other: epub 2021
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Project name : -
Grant ID : 433715509; 433758790
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Funding organization : German Research Foundation

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Title: NeuroImage
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Orlando, FL : Academic Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 241 Sequence Number: 118436 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1053-8119
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954922650166