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  Visual recognition of words learned with gestures induces motor resonance in the forearm muscles

Repetto, C., Mathias, B., Weichselbaum, O., & Macedonia, M. (2021). Visual recognition of words learned with gestures induces motor resonance in the forearm muscles. Scientific Reports, 11: 17278. doi:10.1038/s41598-021-96792-9.

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 Creators:
Repetto, Claudia1, Author
Mathias, Brian2, 3, Author              
Weichselbaum, Otto4, Author
Macedonia, Manuela4, 5, 6, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department of Psychology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Milan, Italy, ou_persistent22              
2Chair of Cognitive and Clinical Neuroscience, TU Dresden, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Max Planck Research Group Neural Mechanisms of Human Communication, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634556              
4Department of Information Engineering, Johannes Kepler University, Linz, Austria, ou_persistent22              
5Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              
6Linz Center of Mechatronics GmbH, AUstria, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Cognitive neuroscience; Human behaviour; Sensorimotor processing
 Abstract: According to theories of Embodied Cognition, memory for words is related to sensorimotor experiences collected during learning. At a neural level, words encoded with self-performed gestures are represented in distributed sensorimotor networks that resonate during word recognition. Here, we ask whether muscles involved in gesture execution also resonate during word recognition. Native German speakers encoded words by reading them (baseline condition) or by reading them in tandem with picture observation, gesture observation, or gesture observation and execution. Surface electromyogram (EMG) activity from both arms was recorded during the word recognition task and responses were detected using eye-tracking. The recognition of words encoded with self-performed gestures coincided with an increase in arm muscle EMG activity compared to the recognition of words learned under other conditions. This finding suggests that sensorimotor networks resonate into the periphery and provides new evidence for a strongly embodied view of recognition memory.

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 Dates: 2020-10-072021-08-032021-08-26
 Publication Status: Published online
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 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1038/s41598-021-96792-9
PMID: 34446772
PMC: PMC8390650
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Title: Scientific Reports
  Abbreviation : Sci. Rep.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London, UK : Nature Publishing Group
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 11 Sequence Number: 17278 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2045-2322
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2045-2322