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  A journey to the west: the ancient dispersal of rice out of East Asia

Spengler, R. N., Stark, S., Zhou, X., Fuks, D., Tang, L., Mir Makhamad, B., et al. (2021). A journey to the west: the ancient dispersal of rice out of East Asia. Rice, 14(1): 83. doi:10.1186/s12284-021-00518-4.

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 Creators:
Spengler, Robert N.1, Author              
Stark, Sören, Author
Zhou, Xinying, Author
Fuks, Daniel, Author
Tang, Li1, Author              
Mir Makhamad, Basira1, Author              
Bjørn, Rasmus1, Author              
Jiang, Hongen, Author
Olivieri, Luca M., Author
Begmatov, Alisher, Author
Boivin, Nicole1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              

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Free keywords: Rice, Paddy farming, West Asia, Archa
 Abstract: Rice is one of the most culturally valued and widely grown crops in the world today, and extensive research over the past decade has clarified much of the narrative of its domestication and early spread across East and South Asia. However, the timing and routes of its dispersal into West Asia and Europe, through which rice eventually became an important ingredient in global cuisines, has remained less clear. In this article, we discuss the piecemeal, but growing, archaeobotanical data for rice in West Asia. We also integrate written sources, linguistic data, and ethnohistoric analogies, in order to better understand the adoption of rice outside its regions of origin. The human-mediated westward spread of rice proceeded gradually, while its social standing and culinary uses repeatedly changing over time and place. Rice was present in West Asia and Europe by the tail end of the first millennium BC, but did not become a significant crop in West Asia until the past few centuries. Complementary historical, linguistic, and archaeobotanical data illustrate two separate and roughly contemporaneous routes of westward dispersal, one along the South Asian coast and the other through Silk Road trade. By better understanding the adoption of this water-demanding crop in the arid regions of West Asia, we explore an important chapter in human adaptation and agricultural decision making.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-08-052021
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 18
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: Introduction
Domestication
- East Asia
- South Asia
Himalayan Plateau
West and Central Asia
- Historical Sources
- Archaeobotanical Data
South Asian Coastal Routes
- Historical Sources
- Archaeobotanical Data
Intensification of Rice Cultivation
Culinary Shift
Conclusions
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1186/s12284-021-00518-4
Other: shh3035
 Degree: -

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Title: Rice
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: New York, NY : Springer New York
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 14 (1) Sequence Number: 83 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1939-8425
ISSN: 1939-8433
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1939-8425