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  Reimagining the relationship between Gondwanan forests and Aboriginal land management in Australia's “Wet Tropics”

Roberts, P., Buhrich, A., Caetano Andrade, V., Cosgrove, R., Fairbairn, A., Florin, S. A., et al. (2021). Reimagining the relationship between Gondwanan forests and Aboriginal land management in Australia's “Wet Tropics”. iScience, 24(3): 102190. doi:10.1016/j.isci.2021.102190.

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 Creators:
Roberts, Patrick1, Author           
Buhrich, Alice, Author
Caetano Andrade, Victor1, Author           
Cosgrove, Richard, Author
Fairbairn, Andrew2, Author           
Florin, S. Anna, Author
Vanwezer, Nils2, Author           
Boivin, Nicole2, Author           
Hunter, Barry, Author
Mosquito, Desley, Author
Turpin, Gerry, Author
Ferrier, Åsa, Author
Affiliations:
1isoTROPIC, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_3383319              
2Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              

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Free keywords: Environmental Science, Environmental Monitoring, Nature Conservation, Environmental Resource, Biological Sciences, Plant Biology, Botany, Plant Ecology, Ethnobotany, Agricultural Science
 Abstract: Summary
The “Wet Tropics” of Australia host a unique variety of plant lineages that trace their origins to the super-continent of Gondwanaland. While these “ancient” evolutionary records are rightly emphasized in current management of the region, multidisciplinary research and lobbying by Rainforest Aboriginal Peoples have also demonstrated the significance of the cultural heritage of the “Wet Tropics.” Here, we evaluate the existing archeological, paleoenvironmental, and historical evidence to demonstrate the diverse ways in which these forests are globally significant, not only for their ecological heritage but also for their preservation of traces of millennia of anthropogenic activities, including active burning and food tree manipulation. We argue that detailed paleoecological, ethnobotanical, and archeological studies, working within the framework of growing national and world heritage initiatives and active application of traditional knowledge, offer the best opportunities for sustainable management of these unique environments in the face of increasingly catastrophic climate change and bushfires.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-03-19
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: 17
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: - Introduction
-- A changing human presence in the Wet Tropics
- A dynamic relationship between humans and tropical forests in Australia
- Historical ecology and ethnobotany
- The necessity of an active cultural heritage—a celebration of “On Country” management in the Wet Tropics
- Conclusions: The global cultural and natural significance of
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.isci.2021.102190
Other: shh3038
 Degree: -

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Project name : PANTROPOCENE
Grant ID : 850709
Funding program : Horizon 2020 (H2020)
Funding organization : European Commission (EC)

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Title: iScience
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Amsterdam ; Bosten ; London ; New York ; Oxford ; Paris ; Philadelphia ; San Diego ; St. Louis : Elsevier
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 24 (3) Sequence Number: 102190 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2589-0042
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2589-0042