English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  A 3,000-year-old, basal S. enterica lineage from Bronze Age Xinjiang suggests spread along the Proto-Silk Road

Wu, X., Ning, C., Key, F. M., Andrades Valtueña, A., Lankapalli, A. K., Gao, S., et al. (2021). A 3,000-year-old, basal S. enterica lineage from Bronze Age Xinjiang suggests spread along the Proto-Silk Road. PLoS Pathogens, 17(9): 1009886, pp. 1-19. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1009886.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
shh3054.pdf (Publisher version), 3MB
Name:
shh3054.pdf
Description:
OA
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-

Locators

show
hide
Locator:
Supporting information (Supplementary material)
Description:
(last seen: Oct. 2021)

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Wu, Xiyan, Author
Ning, Chao1, Author              
Key, Felix Michael2, Author              
Andrades Valtueña, Aida2, Author              
Lankapalli, Aditya Kumar2, Author              
Gao, Shizhu, Author
Yang, Xuan, Author
Zhang, Fan, Author
Liu, Linlin, Author
Nie, Zhongzhi, Author
Ma, Jian, Author
Krause, Johannes2, Author              
Herbig, Alexander2, Author              
Cui, Yinqiu, Author
Affiliations:
1Eurasia3angle, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2301699              
2Archaeogenetics, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074310              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Genomics, Salmonella enterica, Phylogenetic analysis, Pseudogenes, Ancient DNA, Fish genomics, Single nucleotide polymorphisms
 Abstract: Salmonella enterica (S. enterica) has infected humans for a long time, but its evolutionary history and geographic spread across Eurasia is still poorly understood. Here, we screened for pathogen DNA in 14 ancient individuals from the Bronze Age Quanergou cemetery (XBQ), Xinjiang, China. In 6 individuals we detected S. enterica. We reconstructed S. enterica genomes from those individuals, which form a previously undetected phylogenetic branch basal to Paratyphi C, Typhisuis and Choleraesuis–the so-called Para C lineage. Based on pseudogene frequency, our analysis suggests that the ancient S. enterica strains were not host adapted. One genome, however, harbors the Salmonella pathogenicity island 7 (SPI-7), which is thought to be involved in (para)typhoid disease in humans. This offers first evidence that SPI-7 was acquired prior to the emergence of human-adapted Paratyphi C around 1,000 years ago. Altogether, our results show that Salmonella enterica infected humans in Eastern Eurasia at least 3,000 years ago, and provide the first ancient DNA evidence for the spread of a pathogen along the Proto-Silk Road.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-09-212021-10
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 19
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: Introduction
Results
- Identification of S. enterica in the Bronze Age XBQ individuals
- Reconstruction of the ancient S. enterica genomes
- Ancient S. enterica genomes form a previously uncharacterized branch and reveal early diversification under the Para C lineage
- Major pathogenicity island SPI-7 is present in XBQM20
- Estimation of divergence time
- Inference of host specificity using pseudogene frequency
Discussion
Materials and methods
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1009886
Other: shh3054
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: PLoS Pathogens
  Other : PLoS Pathog.
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: San Francisco, CA : Public Library of Science
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 17 (9) Sequence Number: 1009886 Start / End Page: 1 - 19 Identifier: ISSN: 1553-7366
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1000000000018830