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  Prefabrication, patrilineality, and intergenerational reuse: The ruined third church of Aniwa, Southern Vanuatu, and its integration into domestic architecture

Shaw, I., Jones, M. J., Flexner, J. L., & Bedford, S. (2021). Prefabrication, patrilineality, and intergenerational reuse: The ruined third church of Aniwa, Southern Vanuatu, and its integration into domestic architecture. International journal of historical archaeology, s10761-021-00615-6. doi:10.1007/s10761-021-00615-6.

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 Creators:
Shaw, Isabella, Author
Jones, Martin J., Author
Flexner, James L., Author
Bedford, Stuart1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Linguistic and Cultural Evolution, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074311              

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Free keywords: Vernacular architecture, Buildings archaeology, Reuse and recycling, Oceania, Vanuatu
 Abstract: In 1959, the Third Presbyterian Church on Aniwa, a small, low lying island in the TAFEA Province of Southern Vanuatu, was destroyed in Tropical Cyclone Amanda. Following its collapse, structural and other components of the building, a prefabricated structure imported from Australia in 1894, were collected by senior male Elders of the Church and repurposed into domestic architecture. Passed through intergenerational cycles of domestic reuse and favored for structural soundness, much of this material still exists in the homes of male descendants, who still serve important roles in the Presbyterian and wider community. This prefabricated church represents both an expanding network of international capitalism and local Indigenous agency, the blend of which is still evident in Aniwa’s domestic architecture. Survey and interviews revealed not only important structural information about the Third Church, but insight into the patrilineal manner through which structural material and social memory are inherited and dispersed on Aniwa.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-09-20
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: 26
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: Introduction
Prefabricated Buildings in the Pacific
Presbyterianism on Aniwa
From Villages of Thatch, to Church, and Back Again
Evidence for Dispersed and Repurposed Mission Buildings
- In situ Remains
- Repurposed Remains
Using Indigenous Houses to Reconstruct European‑Style Architecture
Intergenerational Reuse: Who Had Access to Materials?
Memory vs. Functionality: Who Retains the Past?
The Bell and the Tam Tam: Old Heritage vs. New Heritage
Conclusions
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1007/s10761-021-00615-6
Other: shh3057
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Title: International journal of historical archaeology
  Abbreviation : Int J Histor Archaeol
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Dordrecht : Springer Science + Business Media B.V
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: s10761-021-00615-6 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1092-7697
ISSN: 1573-7748
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1092-7697