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  Indigenous knowledge and the shackles of wilderness

Fletcher, M.-S., Hamilton, R., Dressler, W., & Palmer, L. (2021). Indigenous knowledge and the shackles of wilderness. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 118(40): e2022218118, pp. 1-7. doi:10.1073/pnas.2022218118.

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free online access (Publisher version)
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article published with an PNAS license

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 Creators:
Fletcher, Michael-Shawn, Author
Hamilton, Rebecca1, Author              
Dressler, Wolfram, Author
Palmer, Lisa, Author
Affiliations:
1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              

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Free keywords: Indigenous and local ecological knowledge, tropical forest, conservation, rethinking wilderness
 Abstract: The environmental crises currently gripping the Earth have been codified in a new proposed geological epoch: the Anthropocene. This epoch, according to the Anthropocene Working Group, began in the mid-20th century and reflects the “great acceleration” that began with industrialization in Europe [J. Zalasiewicz et al., Anthropocene 19, 55–60 (2017)]. Ironically, European ideals of protecting a pristine “wilderness,” free from the damaging role of humans, is still often heralded as the antidote to this human-induced crisis [J. E. M. Watson et al., Nature, 563, 27–30 (2018)]. Despite decades of critical engagement by Indigenous and non-Indigenous observers, large international nongovernmental organizations, philanthropists, global institutions, and nation-states continue to uphold the notion of pristine landscapes as wilderness in conservation ideals and practices. In doing so, dominant global conservation policy and public perceptions still fail to recognize that Indigenous and local peoples have long valued, used, and shaped “high-value” biodiverse landscapes. Moreover, the exclusion of people from many of these places under the guise of wilderness protection has degraded their ecological condition and is hastening the demise of a number of highly valued systems. Rather than denying Indigenous and local peoples’ agency, access rights, and knowledge in conserving their territories, we draw upon a series of case studies to argue that wilderness is an inappropriate and dehumanizing construct, and that Indigenous and community conservation areas must be legally recognized and supported to enable socially just, empowering, and sustainable conservation across scale.There are no data underlying this work.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-09-272021-10-05
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 7
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: European Enlightenment and the Growth of “Wilderness” Thinking
Challenging the Wilderness Ideal: Case Studies from the Tropics
A Path Out of the Wilderness: Hearing Indigenous Voices
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1073/pnas.2022218118
Other: shh3067
 Degree: -

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Title: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  Other : PNAS
  Other : Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA
  Abbreviation : Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Washington, D.C. : National Academy of Sciences
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 118 (40) Sequence Number: e2022218118 Start / End Page: 1 - 7 Identifier: ISSN: 0027-8424
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925427230