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  Face masks protect from infection but may impair social cognition in older adults and people with dementia

Schroeter, M. L., Kynast, J., Villringer, A., & Baron-Cohen, S. (2021). Face masks protect from infection but may impair social cognition in older adults and people with dementia. Frontiers in Psychology, 12: 640548. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2021.640548.

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 Creators:
Schroeter, Matthias L.1, Author              
Kynast, Jana1, Author              
Villringer, Arno1, Author              
Baron-Cohen, Simon2, Author
Affiliations:
1Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              
2Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Coronavirus; COVID; Dementia; Emotion recognition; Face masking; Mindreading; Social cognition
 Abstract: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic will have a high impact on older adults and people with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. Social cognition enables the understanding of another individual's feelings, intentions, desires and mental states, which is particularly important during the COVID-19 pandemic. To prevent further spread of the disease face masks have been recommended. Although justified for prevention of this potentially devastating disease, they partly cover the face and hamper emotion recognition and probably mindreading. As social cognition is already affected by aging and dementia, strategies must be developed to cope with these profound changes of communication. Face masking even could accelerate cognitive decline in the long run. Further studies are of uppermost importance to address face masks' impact on social cognition in aging and dementia, for instance by longitudinally investigating decline before and in the pandemic, and to design compensatory strategies. These issues are also relevant for face masking in general, such as in medical surroundings—beyond the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-12-142021-05-212021-08-13
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2021.640548
Other: eCollection 2021
PMID: 34489776
PMC: PMC8418138
 Degree: -

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Grant ID : CRC 1052 and SCHR 774/5-1
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Funding organization : German Research Foundation (DFG)

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Title: Frontiers in Psychology
  Abbreviation : Front Psychol
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Pully, Switzerland : Frontiers Research Foundation
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 12 Sequence Number: 640548 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1664-1078
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1664-1078