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  Climate change and equestrian empires in the Eastern Steppes: new insights from a high-resolution Lake Core in Central Mongolia

Struck, J., Bliedtner, M., Strobel, P., Taylor, W. T. T., Biskop, S., Plessen, B., et al. (2021). Climate change and equestrian empires in the Eastern Steppes: new insights from a high-resolution Lake Core in Central Mongolia. Research Square, rs-965381/v1. doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-965381/v1.

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S1-S9, Supplementary references (Supplementary material)
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pdf. - (last seen: Nov. 2021)

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 Creators:
Struck, Julian, Author
Bliedtner, Marcel, Author
Strobel, Paul, Author
Taylor, William Timothy Treal, Author
Biskop, Sophie, Author
Plessen, Birgit, Author
Klaes, Björn, Author
Bittner, Lucas, Author
Bayarsaikhan, Jamsranjav1, Author              
Salazar, Gary, Author
Szidat, Sönke, Author
Brenning, Alexander, Author
Bazarradnaa, Enkhtuya, Author
Glaser, Bruno, Author
Zech, Michael, Author
Zech, Roland, Author
Affiliations:
1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              

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Free keywords: Climate change, equestrian empires , high-resolution lake core, Central Mongolia
 Abstract: The repeated expansion of East Asian steppe cultures was a key driver of Eurasian history, forging new social, economic, and biological links across the continent. Climate has been suggested as important driver of these poorly understood cultural expansions, but paleo-climate records from the Mongolian Plateau often suffer from poor age control or ambiguous proxy interpretation. Here, we use a combination of geochemical analyses and comprehensive radiocarbon dating to establish the first robust and detailed record of paleo-hydrological conditions for Lake Telmen, Mongolia, covering the past ~4000 years. Our record shows that humid conditions coincided with solar minima, and hydrological modelling confirms the high sensitivity of the lake to paleo-climate changes. Careful comparisons with archaeological and historical records suggest that in the vast semi-arid grasslands of eastern Eurasia, solar minima led to reduced temperatures, less evaporation, and high biomass production, expanding the power base for pastoral economies and horse cavalry. Our findings suggest a crucial link between temperature dynamics in the Eastern Steppe and key social developments, such as the emergence of pastoral empires, and fuel concerns that global warming enhances water scarcity in the semi-arid regions of interior Eurasia.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-10-21
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: 27
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: 1. Introduction
2. Results
2.1 Sediment core chronology
2.2 Sedimentological and geochemical analyses
2.3 Isotope analyses, evaporation index (EI), and paleohydrology
3. Discussion
3.1 External forcing on the regional climate
3.2 Hydrological modelling
3.3 Climate impact on human history in Mongolia
Methods
 Rev. Type: No review
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.21203/rs.3.rs-965381/v1
Other: shh3084
 Degree: -

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Title: Research Square
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: rs-965381/v1 Start / End Page: - Identifier: URN: https://www.researchsquare.com/