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  Species identification of Australian marsupials using collagen fingerprinting

Peters, C., Richter, K. K., Manne, T., Dortch, J., Paterson, A., Travouillon, K., et al. (2021). Species identification of Australian marsupials using collagen fingerprinting. Royal Society Open Science, 8(10): 211229. doi:10.1098/rsos.211229.

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 Creators:
Peters, Carli1, Author              
Richter, Kristine K., Author
Manne, Tiina, Author
Dortch, Joe, Author
Paterson, Alistair, Author
Travouillon, Kenny, Author
Louys, Julien, Author
Price, Gilbert J., Author
Petraglia, Michael1, Author              
Crowther, Alison1, Author              
Boivin, Nicole1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              

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Free keywords: Australia, zooarchaeology, archaeology, ZooMS
 Abstract: The study of faunal remains from archaeological sites is often complicated by the presence of large numbers of highly fragmented, morphologically unidentifiable bones. In Australia, this is the combined result of harsh preservation conditions and frequent scavenging by marsupial carnivores. The collagen fingerprinting method known as zooarchaeology by mass spectrometry (ZooMS) offers a means to address these challenges and improve identification rates of fragmented bones. Here, we present novel ZooMS peptide markers for 24 extant marsupial and monotreme species that allow for genus-level distinctions between these species. We demonstrate the utility of these new peptide markers by using them to taxonomically identify bone fragments from a nineteenth-century colonial-era pearlshell fishery at Bandicoot Bay, Barrow Island. The suite of peptide biomarkers presented in this study, which focus on a range of ecologically and culturally important species, have the potential to significantly amplify the zooarchaeological and paleontological record of Australia.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-10-272021-11
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 18
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: 1. Introduction
2. Material and methods
2.1. Materials
2.1.1. Modern reference specimens
2.1.2. Archaeological specimens
2.2. Collagen extraction
2.3. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization–tandem time of flight mass spectrometry
2.4. Liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry
2.5. Identification and confirmation of biomarkers
3. Results
3.1. Novel ZooMS peptide markers
3.2. Marsupial versus monotreme ZooMS markers
3.3. Marsupial ZooMS markers
3.4. Using ZooMS to identify macropods
3.5. Collagen fingerprinting of archaeological specimens
4. Discussion
4.1. ZooMS insights at Bandicoot Bay
4.2. Comparison to published markers
4.3. Challenges and future prospects
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1098/rsos.211229
Other: shh3086
 Degree: -

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Title: Royal Society Open Science
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London : Royal Society
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 8 (10) Sequence Number: 211229 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2054-5703
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2054-5703