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  Ancient genome analyses shed light on kinship organization and mating practice of Late Neolithic society in China

Ning, C., Zhang, F., Cao, Y., Qin, L., Hudson, M., Gao, S., et al. (2021). Ancient genome analyses shed light on kinship organization and mating practice of Late Neolithic society in China. iScience, 103352. doi:10.1016/j.isci.2021.103352.

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Supplemental information (Supplementary material)
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(last seen: Nov. 2021)

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 Creators:
Ning, Chao1, Author              
Zhang, Fan, Author
Cao, Yanpeng, Author
Qin, Ling, Author
Hudson, Mark1, Author              
Gao, Shizhu, Author
Ma, Pengcheng, Author
Li, Wei, Author
Zhu, Shuzheng, Author
Li, Chunxia, Author
Li, Tianjiao, Author
Xu, Yang, Author
Li, Chunxiang, Author
Robbeets, Martine1, Author              
Zhang, Hai, Author
Cui, Yinqiu, Author
Affiliations:
1Eurasia3angle, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2301699              

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 Abstract: Anthropology began in the late nineteenth century with an emphasis on kinship as a key factor in human evolution. From the 1960s, archaeologists attempted increasingly sophisticated ways of reconstructing prehistoric kinship but ancient DNA analysis has transformed the field, making it possible, to directly examine kin relations from human skeletal remains. Here, we retrieved genomic data from four Late Neolithic individuals in central China associated with the Late Neolithic Longshan culture. We provide direct evidence of consanguineous mating in ancient China, revealing inbreeding among the Longshan populations. By combining ancient genomic data with anthropological and archaeological evidence, we further show that Longshan society household was built based on the extended beyond the nuclear family, coinciding with intensified social complexity during the Longshan period, perhaps showing the transformation of large communities through a new role of genetic kinship-based extended family units.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-10-252021-11-19
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 17
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: Introduction
Results
- Archaeological and anthropological insight into the Pingliangtai site
- Ancient DNA authentication and uniparental genetic analyses
- Neolithic period genetic contribution into the Yellow River basin from southern China
- Three Pingliangtai individuals share second-degree relatedness (SDR) to each other
- Parental relatedness in the Pingliangtai individuals
Discussion
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.isci.2021.103352
Other: shh3088
 Degree: -

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Title: iScience
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Amsterdam ; Bosten ; London ; New York ; Oxford ; Paris ; Philadelphia ; San Diego ; St. Louis : Elsevier
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: 103352 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2589-0042
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2589-0042