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  Spaced training enhances memory and prefrontal ensemble stability in mice

Glas, A., Hübener, M., Bonhoeffer, T., & Goltstein, P. M. (2021). Spaced training enhances memory and prefrontal ensemble stability in mice. Current Biology, 31(18), 4052-4061.e6. doi:10.1016/j.cub.2021.06.085.

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 Creators:
Glas, Annet1, Author              
Hübener, Mark1, Author              
Bonhoeffer, Tobias1, Author              
Goltstein, Pieter M.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department: Synapses-Circuits-Plasticity / Bonhoeffer, MPI of Neurobiology, Max Planck Society, ou_1113545              

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Free keywords: LONG-TERM; HIPPOCAMPAL INTERACTIONS; CORTEX; CONSOLIDATION; PROTEIN; STIMULATION; COMPETITION; MECHANISMS; ENGRAMS; SPARSEBiochemistry & Molecular Biology; Life Sciences & Biomedicine - Other Topics; Cell Biology;
 Abstract: It is commonly acknowledged that memory is substantially improved when learning is distributed over time, an effect called the "spacing effect". So far it has not been studied how spaced learning affects the neuronal ensembles presumably underlying memory. In the present study, we investigate whether trial spacing increases the stability or size of neuronal ensembles. Mice were trained in the "everyday memory"task, an appetitive, naturalistic, delayed matching-to-place task. Spacing trials by 60 min produced more robust memories than training with shorter or longer intervals. c-Fos labeling and chemogenetic inactivation established the involvement of the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) in successful memory storage. In vivo calcium imaging of excitatory dmPFC neurons revealed that longer trial spacing increased the similarity of the population activity pattern on subsequent encoding trials and upon retrieval. Conversely, trial spacing did not affect the size of the total neuronal ensemble or the size of subpopulations dedicated to specific task-related behaviors and events. Thus, spaced learning promotes reactivation of prefrontal neuronal ensembles processing episodic-like memories.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-09-27
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 17
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: ISI: 000716336500007
DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2021.06.085
 Degree: -

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Project name : Collaborative Research Center SFB870 (project numbers A07 and A08)
Grant ID : -
Funding program : (118803580)
Funding organization : German Research Foundation (DFG)

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Title: Current Biology
  Abbreviation : Curr. Biol.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London, UK : Cell Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 31 (18) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 4052 - 4061.e6 Identifier: ISSN: 0960-9822
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925579107