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  Assessment of reward-related brain function after a single-dose of oxytocin in autism: A randomized controlled trial

Mayer, A. V., Preckel, K., Ihle, K., Piecha, F. A., Junghanns, K., Reiche, S., et al. (2021). Assessment of reward-related brain function after a single-dose of oxytocin in autism: A randomized controlled trial. Biological Psychiatry Global Open Science. doi:10.1016/j.bpsgos.2021.10.004.

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 Creators:
Mayer, Annalina V.1, 2, Author
Preckel, Katrin3, Author              
Ihle, Kristin4, Author              
Piecha, Fabian A.3, Author
Junghanns, Klaus2, Author
Reiche, Stefan2, Author
Rademacher, Lena1, 2, Author
Müller-Pinzler, Laura1, 2, Author
Stolz, David S.1, 2, Author
Kamp-Becker, Inge5, 6, Author
Stroth, Sanna5, 6, Author
Roepke, Stefan7, Author
Küpper, Charlotte8, Author
Engert, Veronika3, 9, Author              
Singer, Tania10, Author              
Kanske, Philipp3, 11, Author              
Paulus, Frieder M.1, 2, Author
Krach, Sören1, 2, Author
Affiliations:
1Social Neuroscience Lab, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Lübeck, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Translational Psychiatry Unit (TPU), Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Lübeck, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Research Group Social Stress and Family Health, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_3025667              
4Methods and Development Unit Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634558              
5Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Philipps University Marburg, Germany, ou_persistent22              
6Center for Mind, Brain and Behavior (CMBB), Philipps University Marburg, Germany, ou_persistent22              
7Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charité University Medicine Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
8Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
9Institute of Psychosocial Medicine and Psychotherapy, Jena University Hospital, Germany, ou_persistent22              
10Social Neuroscience Lab, Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
11Institute of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, TU Dresden, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Oxytocin; Autism spectrum disorders; Reward; Ventral striatum; Amygdala; Social motivation
 Abstract: Background Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by difficulties in social communication and interaction, which have been related to atypical neural processing of rewards, especially in the social domain. Since intranasal oxytocin has been shown to modulate activation of the brain’s reward circuit, oxytocin might ameliorate the processing of social rewards in ASD and thus improve social difficulties. Methods In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover fMRI study, we examined effects of a 24 IU dose of intranasal oxytocin on reward-related brain function in 37 men with ASD without intellectual impairment and 37 age- and IQ-matched control participants. Participants performed an incentive delay task that allows the investigation of neural activity associated with the anticipation and receipt of monetary and social rewards. Results Non-significant tests suggested that oxytocin did not influence neural processes related to the anticipation of social or monetary rewards in either group. Complementary Bayesian analyses indicated moderate evidence for a null model, relative to an alternative model. Our results are inconclusive regarding possible oxytocin effects on amygdala responsiveness to social rewards during reward consumption. There were no significant differences in reward-related brain function between the two groups under placebo. Conclusions Our results do not support the hypothesis that intranasal oxytocin generally enhances activation of reward-related neural circuits in men with and without ASD.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-10-042021-05-172021-10-042021-10-23
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.bpsgos.2021.10.004
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Title: Biological Psychiatry Global Open Science
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Amsterdam : Elsevier
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2667-1743
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2667-1743