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  BONEs not CATs attract DOGs: Semantic context effects for picture naming in the lesioned language network

Pino, D., Mädebach, A., Jescheniak, J. D., Regenbrecht, F., & Obrig, H. (2022). BONEs not CATs attract DOGs: Semantic context effects for picture naming in the lesioned language network. NeuroImage, 246: 118767. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2021.118767.

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 Creators:
Pino, Daniéle1, 2, Author              
Mädebach, Andreas3, Author
Jescheniak, Jörg D.3, Author
Regenbrecht, Frank1, 2, Author
Obrig, Hellmuth1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Clinic for Cognitive Neurology, University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              
3Institute of Psychology, University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Language production; Semantic interference; Picture-word interference paradigm; Aphasia; Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping
 Abstract: The breakdown of rapid and accurate retrieval of words is a hallmark of aphasic speech and a prime target of therapeutic intervention. Complementary, psycho- and neurolinguistic research have developed a spectrum of models, how and by which neuronal network uncompromised speakers can rely on remarkable lexical retrieval capacities. Motivated by both lines of research we invited 32 participants with a chronic left hemispheric brain lesion to name pictures in the presence of distractor words. This picture-word-interference (PWI) paradigm is widely used in psycho- and neurolinguistic research. We find that also after brain lesion categorically related words (CAT → [dog]picture) impede naming, while associatively related words (BONE → [dog]picture) ease access, when compared to unrelated distractor words. The effects largely affecting latencies in neurotypical populations, are reproduced for error rate in our participants with lesions in the language network. Unsurprisingly, overall naming abilities varied greatly across patients. Notably, however, the two effects (categorical interference / associative facilitation) differ between participants. Correlating performance with lesion patterns we find support for the notion of a divergence of brain areas affording different aspects of the task: (i) lesions in the left middle temporal gyurs (MTG) deteriorate overall naming, confirming previous work; more notably, (ii) lesions comprising the inferior frontal hub (inferior frontal gyrus, IFG) of the language-network increase the interference effect for the categorical condition; on the contrary, (iii) lesions to the mid-to-posterior temporal hub (posterior middle and superior temporal gyri, pMTG/ pSTG) increase the facilitatory effect for the associative condition on error rates. The findings can be accommodated in a neuro-linguistic framework, which localizes lexical activation but also lexical interference in posterior parts of the language network (pMTG/pITG); conversely, selection between co-activated categorically related entries is afforded by frontal language areas (IFG). While purely experimental in nature our study highlights that lesion site differentially influences specific aspects of word retrieval. Since confrontational naming is a cornerstone of aphasia rehabilitation, this may be of note when designing and evaluating novel therapeutic regimes.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-11-082021-07-082021-11-292021-11-292022-02-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2021.118767
Other: epub 2021
PMID: 34856377
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Title: NeuroImage
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Orlando, FL : Academic Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 246 Sequence Number: 118767 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1053-8119
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954922650166