English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Integration of visual motion and pursuit signals in areas V3A and V6+ across cortical depth using 9.4T fMRI

Molaei Vaneghi, F., Zaretskaya, N., van Mourik, T., Bause, J., Scheffler, K., & Bartels, A. (submitted). Integration of visual motion and pursuit signals in areas V3A and V6+ across cortical depth using 9.4T fMRI.

Item is

Files

show Files

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Molaei Vaneghi, F1, 2, Author              
Zaretskaya, N1, 2, Author              
van Mourik, T, Author
Bause, J1, 2, Author              
Scheffler, K1, 2, Author              
Bartels, A1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497796              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: Neural mechanisms underlying a stable perception of the world during pursuit eye movements are not fully understood. Both, perceptual stability as well as perception of real (i.e. objective) motion are the product of integration between motion signals on the retina and efference copies of eye movements. Human areas V3A and V6 have previously been shown to have strong objective ('real') motion responses. Here we used high-resolution laminar fMRI at ultra-high magnetic field (9.4T) in human subjects to examine motion integration across cortical depths in these areas. We found an increased preference for objective motion in areas V3A and V6+ i.e. V6 and possibly V6A towards the upper layers. When laminar responses were detrended to remove the upper-layer bias present in all responses, we found a unique, condition-specific laminar profile in V6+, showing reduced mid-layer responses for retinal motion only. The results provide evidence for differential, motion-type dependent laminar processing in area V6+. Mechanistically, the mid-layer dip suggests a special contribution of retinal motion to integration, either in the form of a subtractive (inhibitory) mid-layer input, or in the form of feedback into extragranular or infragranular layers. The results show that differential laminar signals can be measured in high-level motion areas in human occipitoparietal cortex, opening the prospect of new mechanistic insights using non-invasive brain imaging.

Details

show
hide
Language(s):
 Dates: 2021-12
 Publication Status: Submitted
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1101/2021.12.09.471881
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source

show