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  Cell-based tracers as trojan horses for image-guided surgery

Sier, V. Q., de Vries, M. R., van der Vorst, J. R., Vahrmeijer, A. L., van Kooten, C., Cruz, L. J., et al. (2021). Cell-based tracers as trojan horses for image-guided surgery. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 22(2): 755. doi:10.3390/ijms22020755.

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 Creators:
Sier, V. Q., Author
de Vries, M. R., Author
van der Vorst, J. R., Author
Vahrmeijer, A. L., Author
van Kooten, C., Author
Cruz, L. J., Author
de Geus-Oei, L.-F., Author
Ferreira, V., Author
Sier, C. F. M., Author
Alves, Frauke1, Author           
Muthana, M., Author
Affiliations:
1Translational Molecular Imaging, Max Planck Institute of Experimental Medicine, Max Planck Society, ou_2559694              

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Free keywords: cell-based imaging; near-infrared; nuclear imaging; magnetic resonance imaging; leukocyte; mesenchymal stromal cell; platelets; extracellular vesicle; microorganisms; nanoparticle
 Abstract: Surgeons rely almost completely on their own vision and palpation to recognize affected tissues during surgery. Consequently, they are often unable to distinguish between different cells and tissue types. This makes accurate and complete resection cumbersome. Targeted image-guided surgery (IGS) provides a solution by enabling real-time tissue recognition. Most current targeting agents (tracers) consist of antibodies or peptides equipped with a radiolabel for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) labels, or a near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF) dye. These tracers are preoperatively administered to patients, home in on targeted cells or tissues, and are visualized in the operating room via dedicated imaging systems. Instead of using these ‘passive’ tracers, there are other, more ‘active’ approaches of probe delivery conceivable by using living cells (macrophages/monocytes, neutrophils, T cells, mesenchymal stromal cells), cell(-derived) fragments (platelets, extracellular vesicles (exosomes)), and microorganisms (bacteria, viruses) or, alternatively, ‘humanized’ nanoparticles. Compared with current tracers, these active contrast agents might be more efficient for the specific targeting of tumors or other pathological tissues (e.g., atherosclerotic plaques). This review provides an overview of the arsenal of possibilities applicable for the concept of cell-based tracers for IGS.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-01-13
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3390/ijms22020755
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Title: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: 26 Volume / Issue: 22 (2) Sequence Number: 755 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1422-0067