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  Optimized bone sampling protocols for the retrieval of ancient DNA from archaeological remains

Parker, C. E., Bos, K. I., Haak, W., & Krause, J. (2021). Optimized bone sampling protocols for the retrieval of ancient DNA from archaeological remains. Journal of Visualized Experiments, 177: e63250. doi:10.3791/63250.

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Supplemental File 1. (Supplementary material)
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 Creators:
Parker, Cody Edward1, Author              
Bos, Kirsten I.1, Author              
Haak, Wolfgang1, Author              
Krause, Johannes1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Archaeogenetics, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074310              

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Free keywords: Genetics, archaeogenetics, aDNA, bone sampling, forensics, DNA sampling, bioanthropology
 Abstract: The methods presented here seek to maximize the chances for the recovery of human DNA from ancient archaeological remains while limiting input sample material. This was done by targeting anatomical sampling locations previously determined to yield the highest amounts of ancient DNA (aDNA) in a comparative analysis of DNA recovery across the skeleton. Prior research has suggested that these protocols maximize the chances for the successful recovery of ancient human and pathogen DNA from archaeological remains. DNA yields were previously assessed by Parker et al. 2020 in a broad survey of aDNA preservation across multiple skeletal elements from 11 individuals recovered from the medieval (radiocarbon dated to a period of circa (ca.) 1040-1400 CE, calibrated 2-sigma range) graveyard at Krakauer Berg, an abandoned medieval settlement near Peißen Germany. These eight sampling spots, which span five skeletal elements (pars petrosa, permanent molars, thoracic vertebra, distal phalanx, and talus) successfully yielded high-quality ancient human DNA, where yields were significantly greater than the overall average across all elements and individuals. Yields were adequate for use in most common downstream population genetic analyses. Our results support the preferential use of these anatomical sampling locations for most studies involving the analyses of ancient human DNA from archaeological remains. Implementation of these methods will help to minimize the destruction of precious archaeological specimens.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-11-30
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: 20
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: Introduction
Protocol
1. Considerations before sample processing
2. Pretreatment
3. Bone powder generation
Representative Results
Discussion
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3791/63250
URI: https://www.jove.com/t/63250
Other: shh3111
 Degree: -

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Project name : PALEoRIDER
Grant ID : 771234
Funding program : Horizon 2020 (H2020)
Funding organization : European Commission (EC)
Project name : CoDisEASe
Grant ID : 805268
Funding program : Horizon 2020 (H2020)
Funding organization : European Commission (EC)

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Title: Journal of Visualized Experiments
  Other : Journal of Visualized Experiments: JoVE
  Abbreviation : J. Vis. Exp.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Rockville Pike, Bethesda MD : JoVE
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 177 Sequence Number: e63250 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1940-087X
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1940087X