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  Human impact erodes chimpanzee behavioral diversity

Kühl, H. S., Boesch, C., Kulik, L., Haas, F., Arandjelovic, M., Dieguez, P., et al. (2019). Human impact erodes chimpanzee behavioral diversity. Science, 363(6434), 1453-1455. doi:10.1126/science.aau4532.

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 Creators:
Kühl, Hjalmar S.1, 2, Author              
Boesch, Christophe1, 2, Author              
Kulik, Lars3, Author              
Haas, Fabian3, Author              
Arandjelovic, Milica1, 2, Author              
Dieguez, Paula3, Author              
Bocksberger, Gaëlle3, Author              
McElreath, Mary Brooke3, Author              
Agbor, Anthony2, Author              
Angedakin, Samuel3, Author              
Ayimisin, Ayuk Emmanuel3, Author              
Bailey, Emma3, Author              
Barubiyo, Donatienne3, Author              
Bessone, Mattia3, Author              
Brazzola, Gregory3, Author              
Chancellor, Rebecca, Author
Cohen, Heather3, Author              
Coupland, Charlotte3, Author              
Danquah, Emmanuel, Author
Deschner, Tobias1, 4, Author              
Dowd, Dervla, AuthorDunn, Andrew, AuthorEgbe, Villard Ebot3, Author              Eshuis, Henk3, Author              Goedmakers, Annemarie, AuthorGranjon, Anne-Céline3, 5, Author              Head, Josephine S.3, Author              Hedwig, Daniela, AuthorHermans, Veerle, AuthorImong, Inaoyom, AuthorJeffery, Kathryn J., AuthorJones, Sorrel2, 3, Author              Junker, Jessica2, Author              Kadam, Parag, AuthorKambere, Mbangi3, Author              Kambi, Mohamed3, Author              Kienast, Ivonne3, Author              Kujirakwinja, Deo, AuthorLangergraber, Kevin, AuthorLapuente, Juan2, Author              Larson, Bradley3, Author              Lee, Kevin3, Author              Leinert, Vera, AuthorLlana, Manuel, AuthorMaretti, Giovanna3, Author              Marrocoli, Sergio2, Author              Martin, Rumen, AuthorMbi, Tanyi Julius3, Author              Meier, Amelia3, Author              Morgan, Bethan, AuthorMorgan, David, AuthorMulindahabi, Felix, AuthorMurai, Mizuki3, Author              Neil, Emily3, Author              Niyigaba, Protais, AuthorOrmsby, Lucy Jayne3, Author              Orume, Robinson, AuthorPacheco, Liliana, AuthorPiel, Alex, AuthorPreece, Jodie3, Author              Regnaut, Sebastien, AuthorRundus, Aaron, AuthorSanz, Crickette, Authorvan Schijndel, Joost3, Author              Sommer, Volker, AuthorStewart, Fiona, AuthorTagg, Nikki, AuthorVendras, Elleni3, Author              Vergnes, Virginie, AuthorWelsh, Adam3, Author              Wessling, Erin G.2, Author              Willie, Jacob, AuthorWittig, Roman M.1, Author              Yuh, Yisa Ginath3, Author              Yurkiw, Kyle3, Author              Zuberbuehler, Klaus, AuthorKalan, Ammie K.1, 2, Author               more..
Affiliations:
1Chimpanzees, Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society, ou_2149636              
2Great Ape Evolutionary Ecology and Conservation, Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig, DE, ou_2149638              
3Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society, ou_1497674              
4Endocrinology Laboratory, Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig, DE, ou_2025298              
5The Leipzig School of Human Origins (IMPRS), Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig, DE, ou_1497688              

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 Abstract: Chimpanzees possess a large number of behavioral and cultural traits among non-human species. The ‘disturbance hypothesis’ predicts that human impact depletes resources and disrupts social learning processes necessary for behavioral and cultural transmission. We used an unprecedented data set of 144 chimpanzee communities, with information on 31 behaviors, to show that chimpanzees inhabiting areas with high human impact have a mean probability of occurrence reduced by 88%, across all behaviors, compared to low impact areas. This behavioral diversity loss was evident irrespective of the grouping or categorization of behaviors. Therefore, human impact may not only be associated with the loss of populations and genetic diversity, but also affects how animals behave. Our results support the view that ‘culturally significant units’ should be integrated into wildlife conservation.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2019-03-072019-03-29
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 8
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1126/science.aau4532
 Degree: -

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Title: Science
  Abbreviation : Science
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Washington, D.C. : American Association for the Advancement of Science
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 363 (6434) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1453 - 1455 Identifier: ISSN: 0036-8075
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/991042748276600_1