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  Socio-ecological correlates of neophobia in corvids

Miller, R., Lambert, M. L., Frohnwieser, A., Brecht, K. F., Bugnyar, T., Crampton, I., et al. (2022). Socio-ecological correlates of neophobia in corvids. Current Biology, 32(1): 2021.10.045, pp. 74-85.e4. doi:10.1016/j.cub.2021.10.045.

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 Creators:
Miller, Rachael, Author
Lambert, Megan L., Author
Frohnwieser, Anna, Author
Brecht, Katharina F., Author
Bugnyar, Thomas, Author
Crampton, Isabelle, Author
Garcia-Pelegrin, Elias, Author
Gould, Kristy, Author
Greggor, Alison L., Author
Izawa, Ei-Ichi, Author
Kelly, Debbie M., Author
Li, Zhongqiu, Author
Luo, Yunchao, Author
Luong, Linh B., Author
Massen, Jorg J. M., Author
Nieder, Andreas, Author
Reber, Stephan A., Author
Schiestl, Martina1, Author              
Seguchi, Akiko, Author
Sepehri, Parisa, Author
Stevens, Jeffrey R., AuthorTaylor, Alexander H., AuthorWang, Lin, AuthorWolff, London M., AuthorZhang, Yigui, AuthorClayton, Nicola S., Author more..
Affiliations:
1Linguistic and Cultural Evolution, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074311              

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Free keywords: neophobia, corvids, socio-ecological drivers, repeatability, novelty, species differences, island tameness theory, dangerous niche hypothesis, neophobia threshold hypothesis
 Abstract: Behavioral responses to novelty, including fear and subsequent avoidance of novel stimuli, i.e., neophobia, determine how animals interact with their environment. Neophobia aids in navigating risk and impacts on adaptability and survival. There is variation within and between individuals and species; however, lack of large-scale, comparative studies critically limits investigation of the socio-ecological drivers of neophobia. In this study, we tested responses to novel objects and food (alongside familiar food) versus a baseline (familiar food alone) in 10 corvid species (241 subjects) across 10 labs worldwide. There were species differences in the latency to touch familiar food in the novel object and novel food conditions relative to the baseline. Four of seven socio-ecological factors influenced object neophobia: (1) use of urban habitat (versus not), (2) territorial pair versus family group sociality, (3) large versus small maximum flock size, and (4) moderate versus specialized caching (whereas range, hunting live animals, and genus did not), while only maximum flock size influenced food neophobia. We found that, overall, individuals were temporally and contextually repeatable (i.e., consistent) in their novelty responses in all conditions, indicating neophobia is a stable behavioral trait. With this study, we have established a network of corvid researchers, demonstrating potential for further collaboration to explore the evolution of cognition in corvids and other bird species. These novel findings enable us, for the first time in corvids, to identify the socio-ecological correlates of neophobia and grant insight into specific elements that drive higher neophobic responses in this avian family group.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-11-172022-01-22
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 17
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: Introduction
Results
- Species differences
- Effect of socio-ecological factors
- Individual temporal and contextual repeatability
Discussion
STAR★Methods
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2021.10.045
Other: shh3127
 Degree: -

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Title: Current Biology
  Abbreviation : Curr. Biol.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London, UK : Cell Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 32 (1) Sequence Number: 2021.10.045 Start / End Page: 74 - 85.e4 Identifier: ISSN: 0960-9822
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925579107