English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Musical sophistication and speech auditory-motor coupling: Easy tests for quick answers

Rimmele, J. M., Kern, P., Lubinus, C., Frieler, K., Poeppel, D., & Assaneo, M. F. (2022). Musical sophistication and speech auditory-motor coupling: Easy tests for quick answers. Frontiers in Neuroscience, 15: 764342. doi:10.3389/fnins.2021.764342.

Item is

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
neu-22-rim-01-musical.pdf (Publisher version), 3MB
Name:
neu-22-rim-01-musical.pdf
Description:
OA
OA-Status:
Gold
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
2022
Copyright Info:
© 2022 Rimmele, Kern, Lubinus, Frieler, Poeppel and Assaneo. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Rimmele, Johanna Maria1, 2, 3, Author           
Kern, Pius1, Author
Lubinus, Christina1, Author           
Frieler, Klaus4, Author           
Poeppel, David1, 2, 5, 6, Author           
Assaneo, M. Florencia3, Author
Affiliations:
1Department of Neuroscience, Max Planck Institute for Empirical Aesthetics, Max Planck Society, ou_2421697              
2Max Planck NYU Center for Language, Music and Emotion, New York, NY, United States, ou_persistent22              
3Instituto de Neurobiología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Querétaro, México, ou_persistent22              
4Scientific Services, Max Planck Institute for Empirical Aesthetics, Max Planck Society, ou_2421698              
5Department of Psychology, New York University, New York, NY, United States, ou_persistent22              
6Ernst Strüngmann Institute for Neuroscience, Frankfurt, Germany, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: speech, auditory-motor coupling, musical sophistication, synchronization, musical training
 Abstract: Musical training enhances auditory-motor cortex coupling, which in turn facilitates music and speech perception. How tightly the temporal processing of music and speech are intertwined is a topic of current research. We investigated the relationship between musical sophistication (Goldsmiths Musical Sophistication index, Gold-MSI) and spontaneous speech-to-speech synchronization behavior as an indirect measure of speech auditory-motor cortex coupling strength. In a group of participants (n = 196), we tested whether the outcome of the spontaneous speech-to-speech synchronization test (SSS-test) can be inferred from self-reported musical sophistication. Participants were classified as high (HIGHs) or low (LOWs) synchronizers according to the SSS-test. HIGHs scored higher than LOWs on all Gold-MSI subscales (General Score, Active Engagement, Musical Perception, Musical Training, Singing Skills), but the Emotional Attachment scale. More specifically, compared to a previously reported German-speaking sample, HIGHs overall scored higher and LOWs lower. Compared to an estimated distribution of the English-speaking general population, our sample overall scored lower, with the scores of LOWs significantly differing from the normal distribution, with scores in the ∼30th percentile. While HIGHs more often reported musical training compared to LOWs, the distribution of training instruments did not vary across groups. Importantly, even after the highly correlated subscores of the Gold-MSI were decorrelated, particularly the subscales Musical Perception and Musical Training allowed to infer the speech-to-speech synchronization behavior. The differential effects of musical perception and training were observed, with training predicting audio-motor synchronization in both groups, but perception only in the HIGHs. Our findings suggest that speech auditory-motor cortex coupling strength can be inferred from training and perceptual aspects of musical sophistication, suggesting shared mechanisms involved in speech and music perception.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-08-252021-11-222022-01-04
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fnins.2021.764342
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Frontiers in Neuroscience
  Other : Front Neurosci
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Lausanne, Switzerland : Frontiers Research Foundation
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 15 Sequence Number: 764342 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1662-4548
ISSN: 1662-453X
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1662-4548