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  Raising the level: Orangutans solve the floating peanut task without visual feedback

Sebastián-Enesco, C., Amezcua-Valmala, N., Colmenares, F., Mendes, N., & Call, J. (2022). Raising the level: Orangutans solve the floating peanut task without visual feedback. Primates, 63(1), 33-39. doi:10.1007/s10329-021-00952-4.

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Enesco_2021.pdf (Publisher version), 599KB
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 Creators:
Sebastián-Enesco, Carla1, 2, Author
Amezcua-Valmala, Nerea1, 3, Author
Colmenares, Fernando1, 3, Author
Mendes, Natacha4, Author              
Call, Josep5, Author
Affiliations:
1Department of Social, Evolutionary and Comparative Psychobiology, Complutense University of Madrid, Spain, ou_persistent22              
2Department of Research and Psychology in Education, Faculty of Psychology, Complutense University of Madrid, Spain, ou_persistent22              
3Department of Psychology, Faculty of Biomedical Sciences and Health, Universidad Europea de Madrid, Spain, ou_persistent22              
4International Max Planck Research School on Neuroscience of Communication: Function, Structure, and Plasticity, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_2616696              
5School of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of St Andrews, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Floating peanut task; Innovation; Insight; Orangutans; Tool use; Visual feedback
 Abstract: Chimpanzees and orangutans are able to generate innovative behaviors to solve complicated physical problems. For example, when presented with an out-of-reach peanut at the bottom of a vertical tube (floating peanut task-FPT), some of them spontaneously spit water into the tube until the peanut floats to the top. Yet, it is unclear whether this innovative solution results from repeating those actions that bring the peanut incrementally closer to the top or from anticipating the solution before acting. In the current study, we addressed this question by presenting three naïve orangutans with an opaque version of the FPT that prevented them from obtaining visual information about the effect of their actions on the position of the peanut. One of the subjects solved the opaque FPT in the very first trial: he collected water from the faucet and poured it into the opaque tube repeatedly until the hitherto non-visible peanut reached the top. This provides evidence for the first time that orangutans can potentially solve the FPT without relying on sensorimotor learning, but to some extent by mentally representing the problem.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-07-022021-09-182021-10-162022-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1007/s10329-021-00952-4
Other: epub 2021
PMID: 34655344
 Degree: -

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Title: Primates
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Inuyama, Aichi, Japan : Japan Monkey Centre
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 63 (1) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 33 - 39 Identifier: ISSN: 0032-8332
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925435455