English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  The role of social signals in segmenting observed actions in 18‐month‐old children

Kliesch, C., Parise, E., Reid, V., & Hoehl, S. (2021). The role of social signals in segmenting observed actions in 18‐month‐old children. Developmental Science. doi:10.1111/desc.13198.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
Kliesch_2021.pdf (Publisher version), 425KB
Name:
Kliesch_2021.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Kliesch, Christian1, 2, 3, Author              
Parise, Eugenio3, 4, Author
Reid, Vincent3, 5, Author
Hoehl, Stefanie2, 6, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department of Psychology, University of Potsdam, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Max Planck Research Group Early Social Cognition, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_2355694              
3Department of Psychology, Lancaster University, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              
4Center for Mind/Brain Sciences (CIMeC), University of Trento, Italy, ou_persistent22              
5School of Psychology, University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand, ou_persistent22              
6Department of Developmental and Educational Psychology, Faculty of Psychology, University Vienna, Austria, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Action imitation; Action segmentation; Communicative signals; Ostensive communication
 Abstract: Learning about actions requires children to identify the boundaries of an action and its units. Whereas some action units are easily identified, parents can support children's action learning by adjusting the presentation and using social signals. However, currently, little is understood regarding how children use these signals to learn actions. In the current study, we investigate the possibility that communicative signals are a particularly suitable cue for segmenting events. We investigated this hypothesis by presenting 18-month-old children (N = 60) with short action sequences consisting of toy animals either hopping or sliding across a board into a house, but interrupting this two-step sequence either (a) using an ostensive signal as a segmentation cue, (b) using a non-ostensive segmentation cue and (c) without additional segmentation information between the actions. Marking the boundary using communicative signals increased children's imitation of the less salient sliding action. Imitation of the hopping action remained unaffected. Crucially, marking the boundary of both actions using a non-communicative control condition did not increase imitation of either action. Communicative signals might be particularly suitable in segmenting non-salient actions that would otherwise be perceived as part of another action or as non-intentional. These results provide evidence of the importance of ostensive signals at event boundaries in scaffolding children's learning.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-11-24
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1111/desc.13198
Other: online ahead of print
PMID: 34820963
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show hide
Project name : -
Grant ID : ES/L008955/1
Funding program : -
Funding organization : Economic and Social Research Council (UK)

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Developmental Science
  Other : Dev. Sci.
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Oxford, UK : Blackwell
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1363-755X
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/963018343339