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  Evolutionary dynamics of transposable elements in bdelloid rotifers

Nowell, R. W., Wilson, C. G., Almeida, P., Schiffer, P. H., Fontaneto, D., Becks, L., et al. (2021). Evolutionary dynamics of transposable elements in bdelloid rotifers. eLife, 10: e63194. doi:10.7554/eLife.63194.

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 Creators:
Nowell, Reuben W., Author
Wilson, Christopher G., Author
Almeida, Pedro, Author
Schiffer, Philipp H., Author
Fontaneto, Diego, Author
Becks, Lutz1, 2, Author           
Rodriguez, Fernando, Author
Arkhipova, Irina R., Author
Barraclough, Timothy G., Author
Affiliations:
1External Organizations, ou_persistent22              
2Emmy-Noether-Group Community Dynamics, Department Evolutionary Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_2068285              

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Free keywords: bdelloid rotifers, transposable elements, RNAi, evolution of sex
 Abstract: Transposable elements (TEs) are selfish genomic parasites whose ability to spread autonomously is facilitated by sexual reproduction in their hosts. If hosts become obligately asexual, TE frequencies and dynamics are predicted to change dramatically, but the long-term outcome is unclear. Here, we test current theory using whole-genome sequence data from eight species of bdelloid rotifers, a class of invertebrates in which males are thus far unknown. Contrary to expectations, we find a variety of active TEs in bdelloid genomes, at an overall frequency within the range seen in sexual species. We find no evidence that TEs are spread by cryptic recombination or restrained by unusual DNA repair mechanisms. Instead, we find that that TE content evolves relatively slowly in bdelloids and that gene families involved in RNAi-mediated TE suppression have undergone significant expansion, which might mitigate the deleterious effects of active TEs and compensate for the consequences of long-term asexuality.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-09-172021-02-042021-02-052021-02
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.7554/eLife.63194
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Title: eLife
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Cambridge : eLife Sciences Publications
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 10 Sequence Number: e63194 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2050-084X
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2050-084X