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  The wind that shakes the barley: the role of East Asian cuisines on barley grain size

Ritchey, M. M., Sun, Y., Matuzeviciute, G. M., Shoda, S., Pokharia, A. K., Spate, M., et al. (2022). The wind that shakes the barley: the role of East Asian cuisines on barley grain size. World archaeology, 0(0): 2022.2030792, pp. 1-18. doi:10.1080/00438243.2022.2030792.

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 Creators:
Ritchey, Melissa M., Author
Sun, Yufeng, Author
Matuzeviciute, Giedre Motuzaite, Author
Shoda, Shinya, Author
Pokharia, Anil K., Author
Spate, Michael, Author
Tang, Li1, Author           
Song, Jixiang, Author
Li, Haiming, Author
Dong, Guanghui, Author
Vaiglova, Petra, Author
Frachetti, Michael, Author
Liu, Xinyi, Author
Affiliations:
1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              

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Free keywords: Barley, food globalization, ancient culinary practices, grain size, prehistory
 Abstract: This paper investigates the eastern movements of barley grains and their morphological variations in prehistory. By combining previously published and newly collected archaeobotanical grain measurements (n = 2,176), we explore the roles of culinary traditions underlying the morphological traits observed. We find that barley diminished in size as it moved from its origin in southwestern Asia to Central and East Asia between the third millennium BC and first millennium BC. In particular, the grains in Monsoonal China became greatly reduced in comparison to other regions as the crop was incorporated into eastern small grain cuisines. The reverse pattern is observed in the high-altitude Tibetan environment, which is attributed to the practicalities of cooking under low vapour pressure conditions. These results, demonstrating that barley moved eastward but western grinding and baking traditions did not, reveal the complexity of the eastern culinary system and raise awareness of decoupling of grains and their associated cuisines.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2022-02-012022
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 19
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: Introduction
Materials and methods
- Materials
- Methods
Results
- Regional barley measurements
- Elevation
- Hulled and naked barley
Discussion
- Grain size reduction as barley heads east
- Hulled, naked, two- and multiple row varieties
- Tibetan boiling-steaming free zone
- Towards a complex culinary system in eastern Eurasia
Conclusion
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 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1080/00438243.2022.2030792
Other: shh3142
 Degree: -

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Title: World archaeology
  Abbreviation : WA
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London [u.a.] : Taylor & Francis
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 0 (0) Sequence Number: 2022.2030792 Start / End Page: 1 - 18 Identifier: ISSN: 0043-8243
ISSN: 1470-1375
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/0043-8243