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  Kiwi Diwali: a longitudinal investigation of perceived social connection following a civic religious ritual

Piven, S. D., Fischer, R., Shaver, J. H., Mogan, R., Karl, J. A., Kesberg, R., et al. (2022). Kiwi Diwali: a longitudinal investigation of perceived social connection following a civic religious ritual. Religion, Brain & Behavior, 2021.2006288. doi:10.1080/2153599X.2021.2006288.

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Genre: Journal Article

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(last seen: Feb. 2022)

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 Creators:
Piven, Sofia D., Author
Fischer, Ronald, Author
Shaver, John H., Author
Mogan, Reneeta, Author
Karl, Johannes A., Author
Kesberg, Rebekka, Author
Richardson, Amanda, Author
Singh, Purnima, Author
Tewari, Shruti, Author
Bulbulia, Joseph1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Linguistic and Cultural Evolution, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074311              

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Free keywords: Diwali, social cognition, longitudinal, religion, religious diversity, democracy, ritual
 Abstract: Religious rituals are ubiquitous. Recent research indicates they can powerfully affect social connection, increasing collective sentiments and behaviors. However, the extent to which these effects depend on religious commitment remains unclear. Here, we use longitudinal data to investigate this question in a natural ritual setting by comparing the responses of religiously committed Hindus and non-Hindus immediately after a public Diwali celebration in New Zealand, and for two weeks following. Effects of time and level of religious commitment are assessed on five targets that measure reported social connection of participants to themselves and to specific groups: “Myself,” “My family and friends,” “Work colleagues/university peers,” “People who celebrate Diwali,” and “Humanity in general.” We find that participation in the civic religious ritual affects social connection of all participants, with stronger effects among religiously committed Hindus. Private religious behavior appears integral to the mechanisms underpinning the amplification of solidarity at public rituals, as we find separation in the level of reported social connection to Diwali celebrants between practicing and non-practicing Hindus. Though religious commitment leads to greater perceived social connection, this study additionally demonstrates that in a religiously diverse democracy, a civic religious ritual may foster greater democratic unions across religious differences.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2022-02-08
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: 20
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: Introduction
- Background research
- Research setting
Method
- Ethics and data
- Recruitment
- Participants
- Outcome measures
- Multiple imputation
- Statistical models
- Multicollinearity test
Results
Discussion
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1080/2153599X.2021.2006288
Other: shh3143
 Degree: -

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Title: Religion, Brain & Behavior
  Abbreviation : RBB
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
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Publ. Info: Abingdon : Routledge
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: 2021.2006288 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2153-599X
ISSN: 2153-5981
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2153-599X