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  Innovative ochre processing and tool use in China 40,000 years ago

Wang, F.-G., Yang, S., Ge, J.-Y., Ollé, A., Zhao, K.-L., Yue, J.-P., et al. (2022). Innovative ochre processing and tool use in China 40,000 years ago. Nature, 603(7900): s41586-022-04445-2, pp. 284-289. doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04445-2.

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supplementary text, Figures, Tables and references (Supplementary material)
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available in the institutes network. - (last seen: March 2022)
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 Creators:
Wang, Fa-Gang, Author
Yang, Shixia1, Author              
Ge, Jun-Yi, Author
Ollé, Andreu, Author
Zhao, Ke-Liang, Author
Yue, Jian-Ping, Author
Rosso, Daniela Eugenia, Author
Douka, Katerina1, 2, Author              
Guan, Ying, Author
Li, Wen-Yan, Author
Yang, Hai-Yong, Author
Liu, Lian-Qiang, Author
Xie, Fei, Author
Guo, Zheng-Tang, Author
Zhu, Ri-Xiang, Author
Deng, Cheng-Long, Author
d’Errico, Francesco, Author
Petraglia, Michael1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              
2FINDER, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2541700              

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Free keywords: Archaeology
 Abstract: Homo sapiens was present in northern Asia by around 40,000 years ago, having replaced archaic populations across Eurasia after episodes of earlier population expansions and interbreeding1–4. Cultural adaptations of the last Neanderthals, the Denisovans and the incoming populations of H. sapiens into Asia remain unknown1,5–7. Here we describe Xiamabei, a well-preserved, approximately 40,000-year-old archaeological site in northern China, which includes the earliest known ochre-processing feature in east Asia, a distinctive miniaturized lithic assemblage with bladelet-like tools bearing traces of hafting, and a bone tool. The cultural assembly of traits at Xiamabei is unique for Eastern Asia and does not correspond with those found at other archaeological site assemblages inhabited by archaic populations or those generally associated with the expansion of H. sapiens, such as the Initial Upper Palaeolithic8–10. The record of northern Asia supports a process of technological innovations and cultural diversification emerging in a period of hominin hybridization and admixture2,3,6,11.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2022-03-022022-03-10
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 23
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: Evidence for ochre processing
Novel miniaturized lithics showing hafting
Implications for cultural adaptations
Methods
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1038/s41586-022-04445-2
Other: shh3160
 Degree: -

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Project name : FINDER
Grant ID : 715069
Funding program : Horizon 2020 (H2020)
Funding organization : European Commission (EC)

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Title: Nature
  Abbreviation : Nature
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London : Nature Publishing Group
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 603 (7900) Sequence Number: s41586-022-04445-2 Start / End Page: 284 - 289 Identifier: ISSN: 0028-0836
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925427238