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  Mistletoe viscin : a hygro- and mechano-responsive cellulose-based adhesive for diverse materials applications

Horbelt, N., Fratzl, P., & Harrington, M. J. (2022). Mistletoe viscin: a hygro- and mechano-responsive cellulose-based adhesive for diverse materials applications. PNAS Nexus, 1(1): pgac026. doi:10.1093/pnasnexus/pgac026.

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 Creators:
Horbelt, Nils1, Author              
Fratzl, Peter2, Author              
Harrington, Matthew J.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Matthew Harrington, Biomaterialien, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society, ou_1863292              
2Peter Fratzl, Biomaterialien, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society, ou_1863294              

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Free keywords: bio-adhesive, cellulose, films, mechanoresponsive
 Abstract: Mistletoe viscin is a natural cellulosic adhesive consisting of hierarchically organized cellulose microfibrils (CMFs) surrounded by a humidity-responsive matrix that enables mechanical drawing into stiff and sticky fibers. Here, we explored the processability and adhesive capacity of viscin and demonstrated its potential as a source material for various materials applications, as well as a source for bio-inspired design. Specifically, we revealed that viscin fibers exhibit humidity-activated self-adhesive properties that enable “contact welding” into complex 2D and 3D architectures under ambient conditions. We additionally discovered that viscin can be processed into stiff and transparent free-standing films via biaxial stretching in the hydrated state, followed by drying, whereby CMFs align along local stress fields. Furthermore, we determined that viscin adheres strongly to both synthetic materials (metals, plastics, glass) and biological tissues, such as skin and cartilage. In particular, skin adhesion makes viscin a compelling candidate as a wound sealant, as we further demonstrate. These findings highlight the enormous potential of this hygro- and mechanoresponsive fiber-reinforced adhesive for bio-inspired and biomedical applications.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2022-03-162022
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1093/pnasnexus/pgac026
PMID: 0623
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Title: PNAS Nexus
  Alternative Title : PNAS Nexus
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Oxford : Oxford University Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 1 (1) Sequence Number: pgac026 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2752-6542