English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Plasma oxytocin is modulated by mental training, but does not mediate its stress-buffering effect

Hoehne, K., Vrticka, P., Engert, V., & Singer, T. (2022). Plasma oxytocin is modulated by mental training, but does not mediate its stress-buffering effect. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 141: 105734. doi:10.1016/j.psyneuen.2022.105734.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
Hoehne_pre.pdf (Preprint), 2MB
Name:
Hoehne_pre.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-
:
Hoehne_2022.pdf (Publisher version), 3MB
Name:
Hoehne_2022.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Hoehne, Katja1, Author
Vrticka, Pascal2, 3, Author              
Engert, Veronika1, 3, Author              
Singer, Tania4, Author              
Affiliations:
1Institute of Psychosocial Medicine and Psychotherapy, Jena University Hospital, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Department of Psychology, University of Essex, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              
3Research Group Social Stress and Family Health, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_3025667              
4Social Neuroscience Lab, Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Oxytocin; Cortisol; Psychosocial stress; Contemplative mental training; Meditation
 Abstract: Based on its role in social processing and stress, oxytocin has been suggested to mediate stress reduction of socio-affective, compassion-based mental training. We tested this hypothesis in the ReSource Project, a 9-month longitudinal mental training study. Participants practiced three different types of mental training, targeting either attentional abilities (Presence Module), socio-affective or socio-cognitive abilities (Affect and Perspective Modules). We investigated plasma oxytocin levels, and their link to cortisol and subjective reactivity to acute psychosocial stress as a function of previous mental training (n = 313). In a subsample (n = 113), to better understand oxytocin’s involvement in the effects of socio-affective training, we explored oxytocin, cortisol and subjective experiential responses to a single Loving-kindness Meditation (LKM) conducted after three months of Affect training (versus rest without prior training). We found that, independent of mental training, stress triggered acute oxytocin release. Following a single LKM, however, acute oxytocin release was unaffected. Training effects were only found in overall oxytocin release during both, stress and LKM. Compared to no training, 3-month compassion-based Affect training decreased overall oxytocin levels in the context of psychosocial stress, but increased overall oxytocin levels during LKM. Training-induced changes in overall oxytocin were unrelated to cortisol and subjective stress reactivity. Based on Quintana and Guastella's (2020) theory of oxytocin as an allostatic hormone with anticipatory properties, we interpret training-induced changes in overall oxytocin levels as alterations in the anticipated emotional relevance of specific events. After training socio-affective skills for three months, the stressful situation may have lost its emotional saliency, whereas the meditation technique itself gained emotional relevance. We conclude that changes in peripheral oxytocin release do not mediate stress reduction after mental training, and encourage the investigation of an allostatic concept of oxytocin in future research.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2022-03-152021-07-022022-03-162022-03-192022-07
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2022.105734
Other: epub 2022
PMID: 35367715
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show hide
Project name : -
Grant ID : 205557
Funding program : -
Funding organization : European Research Council

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Psychoneuroendocrinology
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Oxford : Pergamon
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 141 Sequence Number: 105734 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 0306-4530
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925514499