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  Geographically dispersed zoonotic tuberculosis in pre-contact South American human populations

Vågene, Å. J., Honap, T. P., Harkins, K. M., Rosenberg, M. S., Giffin, K., Cárdenas-Arroyo, F., et al. (2022). Geographically dispersed zoonotic tuberculosis in pre-contact South American human populations. Nature Communications, 13(1): 1195. doi:10.1038/s41467-022-28562-8.

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 Creators:
Vågene, Åshild J.1, Author              
Honap, Tanvi P., Author
Harkins, Kelly M., Author
Rosenberg, Michael S., Author
Giffin, Karen1, Author              
Cárdenas-Arroyo, Felipe, Author
Leguizamón, Laura Paloma, Author
Arnett, Judith, Author
Buikstra, Jane E., Author
Herbig, Alexander1, Author              
Krause, Johannes1, 2, Author              
Stone, Anne C., Author
Bos, Kirsten I.1, 3, 4, Author              
Affiliations:
1Archaeogenetics, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074310              
2MHAAM, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2541699              
3CoDisEASe, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_3033585              
4tide, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2591691              

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Free keywords: Archaeology, Biological anthropology, Genome evolution, Infectious diseases, Tuberculosis
 Abstract: Previous ancient DNA research has shown that Mycobacterium pinnipedii, which today causes tuberculosis (TB) primarily in pinnipeds, infected human populations living in the coastal areas of Peru prior to European colonization. Skeletal evidence indicates the presence of TB in several pre-colonial South and North American populations with minimal access to marine resources— a scenario incompatible with TB transmission directly from infected pinnipeds or their tissues. In this study, we investigate the causative agent of TB in ten pre-colonial, non-coastal individuals from South America. We reconstruct M. pinnipedii genomes (10- to 15-fold mean coverage) from three contemporaneous individuals from inland Peru and Colombia, demonstrating the widespread dissemination of M. pinnipedii beyond the coast, either through human-to-human and/or animal-mediated routes. Overall, our study suggests that TB transmission in the pre-colonial era Americas involved a more complex transmission pathway than simple pinniped-to-human transfer.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2022-03-07
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: 12
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: Introduction
Results
- In-solution genome capture.
- Analysis of non-MTBC mycobacterial contamination.
- Mapping statistics.
- Authentication of ancient DNA damage patterns.
- Archaeological context.
- Phylogenetic analyses and molecular dating of ancient MTBC.
- Regions of difference.
Discussion
Methods

 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1038/s41467-022-28562-8
Other: shh3171
 Degree: -

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Project name : CoDisEASe
Grant ID : 805268
Funding program : Horizon 2020 (H2020)
Funding organization : European Commission (EC)

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Title: Nature Communications
  Abbreviation : Nat. Commun.
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: London : Nature Publishing Group
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 13 (1) Sequence Number: 1195 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2041-1723
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2041-1723