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  Global processes of anthropogenesis characterise the early Anthropocene in the Japanese Islands

Hudson, M., Uchiyama, J., Lindström, K., Kawashima, T., Reader, I., Kawashima, T. D., et al. (2022). Global processes of anthropogenesis characterise the early Anthropocene in the Japanese Islands. Humanities and Social Sciences Communications, 9(1): 84. doi:10.1057/s41599-022-01094-8.

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 Creators:
Hudson, Mark1, 2, Author              
Uchiyama, Junzō, Author
Lindström, Kati, Author
Kawashima, Takamune, Author
Reader, Ian, Author
Kawashima, Tinka Delakorda, Author
Martin, Danièle, Author
Gillam, J. Christoper, Author
Gilaizeau, Linda2, Author              
Bausch, Ilona R., Author
Hoover, Kara C., Author
Affiliations:
1Archaeolinguistics Research Group, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_3367852              
2Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              

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Free keywords: History, Humanities
 Abstract: Although many scholars date the onset of the Anthropocene to the Industrial Revolution or the post-1945 ‘Great Acceleration’, there is growing interest in understanding earlier human impacts on the earth system. Research on the ‘Palaeoanthropocene’ has investigated the role of fire, agriculture, trade, urbanisation and other anthropogenic impacts. While there is increasing consensus that such impacts were more important than previously realised, geographical variation during the Palaeoanthropocene remains poorly understood. Here, we present a preliminary comparative analysis of claims that pre-industrial anthropogenic impacts in Japan were significantly reduced by four factors: the late arrival of agriculture, an emphasis on wet-rice farming limited to alluvial plains, a reliance on seafood rather than domesticated animals as a primary source of dietary protein, and cultural ideologies of environmental stewardship. We find that none of these claims of Japanese exceptionalism can be supported by the archaeological and historical records. We make some suggestions for further research but conclude that the Japanese sequence appears consistent with global trends towards increased anthropogenic impacts over the course of the Palaeoanthropocene.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2022-03-16
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: 11
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: Introduction
Claims for Japanese environmental exceptionalism
- Claim 1: late arrival of agriculture.
- Claim 2: the sustainability of rice.
- Claim 3: domesticated animals versus marine foods.
- Claim 4: cultural ideologies of stewardship.
Conclusions
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1057/s41599-022-01094-8
Other: shh3177
 Degree: -

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Project name : Eurasia3angle
Grant ID : 646612
Funding program : Horizon 2020 (H2020)
Funding organization : European Commission (EC)

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Title: Humanities and Social Sciences Communications
  Other : Humanities & Social Sciences Communications
  Other : Palgrave Communications (formerly)
  Abbreviation : Humanit Soc Sci Commun
Source Genre: Journal
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Affiliations:
Publ. Info: London ; USA : Springer Nature ; Palgrave Macmillan
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 9 (1) Sequence Number: 84 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2055-1045
ISSN: 2662-9992
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2055-1045