English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  The role of the angular gyrus in semantic cognition: A synthesis of five functional neuroimaging studies

Kuhnke, P., Chapman, C., Cheung, V. K. M., Turker, S., Graessner, A., Martin, S., et al. (2022). The role of the angular gyrus in semantic cognition: A synthesis of five functional neuroimaging studies. Brain Structure & Function. doi:10.1007/s00429-022-02493-y.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
Kuhnke_2022.pdf (Publisher version), 3MB
Name:
Kuhnke_2022.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Kuhnke, Philipp1, Author              
Chapman, Curtiss1, Author              
Cheung, Vincent Ka Ming2, Author              
Turker, Sabrina1, Author              
Graessner, Astrid1, Author              
Martin, Sandra1, Author              
Williams, Kathleen1, Author              
Hartwigsen, Gesa1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Lise Meitner Research Group Cognition and Plasticity, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_3025665              
2Institute of Information Science, Academia Sinica, Taipei City, Taiwan, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Concepts; Default mode network; Inferior parietal lobe; Semantic memory; fMRI
 Abstract: Semantic knowledge is central to human cognition. The angular gyrus (AG) is widely considered a key brain region for semantic cognition. However, the role of the AG in semantic processing is controversial. Key controversies concern response polarity (activation vs. deactivation) and its relation to task difficulty, lateralization (left vs. right AG), and functional-anatomical subdivision (PGa vs. PGp subregions). Here, we combined the fMRI data of five studies on semantic processing (n = 172) and analyzed the response profiles from the same anatomical regions-of-interest for left and right PGa and PGp. We found that the AG was consistently deactivated during non-semantic conditions, whereas response polarity during semantic conditions was inconsistent. However, the AG consistently showed relative response differences between semantic and non-semantic conditions, and between different semantic conditions. A combined analysis across all studies revealed that AG responses could be best explained by separable effects of task difficulty and semantic processing demand. Task difficulty effects were stronger in PGa than PGp, regardless of hemisphere. Semantic effects were stronger in left than right AG, regardless of subregion. These results suggest that the AG is engaged in both domain-general task-difficulty-related processes and domain-specific semantic processes. In semantic processing, we propose that left AG acts as a "multimodal convergence zone" that binds different semantic features associated with the same concept, enabling efficient access to task-relevant features.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-12-212022-04-042022-04-27
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1007/s00429-022-02493-y
Other: online ahead of print
PMID: 35476027
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Brain Structure & Function
  Abbreviation : Brain Struct Funct
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Berlin : Springer
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1863-2653
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1863-2653