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  What is it like to be a chimpanzee?

Tomasello, M. (2022). What is it like to be a chimpanzee? Synthese, 200: 102. doi:10.1007/s11229-022-03574-5.

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This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

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Tomasello, Michael1, Author                 
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1Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society, ou_1497671              

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 Abstract: Chimpanzees and humans are close evolutionary relatives who behave in many of the same ways based on a similar type of agentive organization. To what degree do they experience the world in similar ways as well? Using contemporary research in evolutionarily biology and animal cognition, I explicitly compare the kinds of experience the two species of capable of having. I conclude that chimpanzees’ experience of the world, their experiential niche as I call it, is: (i) intentional in basically the same way as humans’; (ii) rational in the sense that it is self-critical and operates with logically structured causal and intentional inferences; but (iii) not normative at all in that it does not operate with “objective” evaluative standards. Scientific data do not answer philosophical questions, but they provide rich raw material for scientists and philosophers alike to reflect on and clarify fundamental psychological concepts.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2022-04-062022
 Publication Status: Issued
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 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1007/s11229-022-03574-5
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Title: Synthese
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 200 Sequence Number: 102 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 0039-7857
ISSN: 1573-0964