English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Molecular imaging of central dopamine in obesity: A qualitative review across substrates and radiotracers

Janssen, L., & Horstmann, A. (2022). Molecular imaging of central dopamine in obesity: A qualitative review across substrates and radiotracers. Brain Sciences, 12(4): 486. doi:10.3390/brainsci12040486.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
Janssen_2022.pdf (Publisher version), 2MB
Name:
Janssen_2022.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Janssen, Lieneke1, 2, Author              
Horstmann, Annette1, 3, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              
2Institute of Psychology, Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Department of Psychology and Logopedics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: BMI; Positron Emission Tomography; Dopamine; Obesity; Single-photon emission tomography
 Abstract: Dopamine is a neurotransmitter that plays a crucial role in adaptive behavior. A wealth of studies suggests obesity-related alterations in the central dopamine system. The most direct evidence for such differences in humans comes from molecular neuroimaging studies using positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The aim of the current review is to give a comprehensive overview of molecular neuroimaging studies that investigated the relation between BMI or weight status and any dopamine target in the striatal and midbrain regions of the human brain. A structured literature search was performed and a summary of the extracted findings are presented for each of the four available domains: (1) D2/D3 receptors, (2) dopamine release, (3) dopamine synthesis, and (4) dopamine transporters. Recent proposals of a nonlinear relationship between severity of obesity and dopamine imbalances are described while integrating findings within and across domains, after which limitations of the review are discussed. We conclude that despite many observed associations between obesity and substrates of the dopamine system in humans, it is unlikely that obesity can be traced back to a single dopaminergic cause or consequence. For effective personalized prevention and treatment of obesity, it will be crucial to identify possible dopamine (and non-dopamine) profiles and their functional characteristics.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2022-04-052022-02-282022-04-062022-04-08
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3390/brainsci12040486
PMID: 35448017
PMC: PMC9031606
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Brain Sciences
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Basel, Switzerland : Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 12 (4) Sequence Number: 486 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2076-3425
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2076-3425