English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Do I look like I'm sure?: Partial metacognitive access to the low-level aspects of one's own facial expressions

Ciston, A. B., Forster, C., Brick, T. R., Kühn, S., Verrel, J., & Filevich, E. (2022). Do I look like I'm sure?: Partial metacognitive access to the low-level aspects of one's own facial expressions. Cognition, 225: 105155. doi:10.1016/j.cognition.2022.105155.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Ciston, Anthony B.1, 2, 3, Author
Forster, Carina1, 2, 3, 4, Author              
Brick, Timothy R.5, 6, Author
Kühn, Simone7, 8, Author
Verrel, Julius9, 10, Author
Filevich, Elisa1, 2, 3, 9, Author
Affiliations:
1Department of Psychology, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience, Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              
5Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA, USA, ou_persistent22              
6Institute for Computational and Data Sciences, Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA, USA, ou_persistent22              
7Lise Meitner Group for Environmental Neuroscience, Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
8Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany, ou_persistent22              
9Center for Lifespan Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
10Institute of Systems Motor Science (ISMS), University of Lübeck, Germany, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Metacognition; Facial expressions; Confidence
 Abstract: As humans we communicate important information through fine nuances in our facial expressions, but because conscious motor representations are noisy, we might not be able to report these fine movements. Here we measured the precision of the explicit metacognitive information that young adults have about their own facial expressions. Participants imitated pictures of themselves making facial expressions and triggered a camera to take a picture of them while doing so. They then rated how well they thought they imitated each expression. We defined metacognitive access to facial expressions as the relationship between objective performance (how well the two pictures matched) and subjective performance ratings. As a group, participants' metacognitive confidence ratings were only about four times less precise than their own similarity ratings. In turn, machine learning analyses revealed that participants' performance ratings were based on idiosyncratic subsets of features. We conclude that metacognitive access to one's own facial expressions is only partial.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2022-03-072021-07-042022-04-272022-05-072022-08
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.cognition.2022.105155
Other: online ahead of print
PMID: 35537345
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Cognition
  Other : Cognition
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Amsterdam : Elsevier
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 225 Sequence Number: 105155 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 0010-0277
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925391298