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  Genetic and phylogenetic uncoupling of structure and function in human transmodal cortex

Valk, S. L., Xu, T., Paquola, C., Park, B.-y., Bethlehem, R. A. I., Vos de Wael, R., et al. (2022). Genetic and phylogenetic uncoupling of structure and function in human transmodal cortex. Nature Communications, 13(1): 2341. doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29886-1.

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 Creators:
Valk, Sofie L.1, 2, 3, Author              
Xu, Ting4, Author
Paquola, Casey5, 6, Author
Park, Bo-yong5, 7, 8, Author
Bethlehem, Richard A. I.9, Author
Vos de Wael, Reinder5, Author
Royer, Jessica5, Author
Masouleh, Shahrzad Kharabian2, 3, Author
Bayrak, Seyma10, Author              
Kochunov, Peter11, Author
Yeo, B. T. Thomas12, 13, 14, 15, 16, Author
Margulies, Daniel17, Author
Smallwood, Jonathan18, Author
Eickhoff, Simon B.2, 3, Author
Bernhardt, Boris C.5, Author
Affiliations:
1Otto Hahn Group Cognitive Neurogenetics, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_3222264              
2Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Research Center Jülich, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Institute of Systems Neuroscience, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Center for the Developing Brain, Child Mind Institute, New York, NY, USA, ou_persistent22              
5Multimodal Imaging and Connectome Analysis Laboratory, Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada, ou_persistent22              
6Structural and Functional Organisation of the Brain, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Research Center Jülich, Germany, ou_persistent22              
7Department of Data Science, Inha University, Incheon, Republic of Korea, ou_persistent22              
8Center for Neuroscience Imaging Research, Institute for Basic Science, Suwon, Republic of Korea, ou_persistent22              
9Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              
10Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              
11Department of Psychiatry, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA, ou_persistent22              
12Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, ou_persistent22              
13Centre for Translational Magnetic Resonance Research, National University of Singapore, ou_persistent22              
14Institute for Digital Medicine, National University of Singapore, ou_persistent22              
15Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA, ou_persistent22              
16Integrative Sciences and Engineering Programme, National University of Singapore, ou_persistent22              
17Neuroanatomy and Connectivity Lab, Institut du Cerveau et de la Moelle épinière (ICM), Université Paris-Sorbonne, France, ou_persistent22              
18Department of Psychology, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada, ou_persistent22              

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 Abstract: Brain structure scaffolds intrinsic function, supporting cognition and ultimately behavioral flexibility. However, it remains unclear how a static, genetically controlled architecture supports flexible cognition and behavior. Here, we synthesize genetic, phylogenetic and cognitive analyses to understand how the macroscale organization of structure-function coupling across the cortex can inform its role in cognition. In humans, structure-function coupling was highest in regions of unimodal cortex and lowest in transmodal cortex, a pattern that was mirrored by a reduced alignment with heritable connectivity profiles. Structure-function uncoupling in macaques had a similar spatial distribution, but we observed an increased coupling between structure and function in association cortices relative to humans. Meta-analysis suggested regions with the least genetic control (low heritable correspondence and different across primates) are linked to social-cognition and autobiographical memory. Our findings suggest that genetic and evolutionary uncoupling of structure and function in different transmodal systems may support the emergence of complex forms of cognition.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-06-292022-04-012022-05-09
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1038/s41467-022-29886-1
PMID: 35534454
PMC: PMC9085871
 Degree: -

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Title: Nature Communications
  Abbreviation : Nat. Commun.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London : Nature Publishing Group
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 13 (1) Sequence Number: 2341 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2041-1723
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2041-1723