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  Membrane wetting, molding and reticulation by protein condensates

Mangiarotti, A., Chen, N., Zhao, Z., Lipowsky, R., & Dimova, R. (2022). Membrane wetting, molding and reticulation by protein condensates. bioRxiv, 2022.06.03.494704. doi:10.1101/2022.06.03.494704.

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Mangiarotti, Agustín1, Author              
Chen, Nannan2, Author
Zhao, Ziliang3, Author              
Lipowsky, Reinhard4, Author              
Dimova, Rumiana1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Rumiana Dimova, Kolloidchemie, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society, ou_3360040              
2Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society, Am Mühlenberg 1, 14476 Potsdam, DE, ou_1863284              
3Rumiana Dimova, Theorie & Bio-Systeme, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society, ou_1863328              
4Reinhard Lipowsky, Theorie & Bio-Systeme, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society, ou_1863327              

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 Abstract: Cells compartmentalize their components in liquid-like condensates, which can be reconstituted in vitro. Although these condensates interact with membrane-bound organelles, the potential of membrane remodeling and the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that interactions between protein condensates and membranes can lead to remarkable morphological transformations and describe these with theoretical analysis. Modulation of solution salinity or membrane composition drives the condensate-membrane system through two wetting transitions, from dewetting, through a broad regime of partial wetting, to complete wetting. The observed morphologies are governed by the interplay of adhesion, membrane elasticity and interfacial tension. A new phenomenon, namely reticulation or fingering of the condensate-membrane interface is observed when sufficient membrane area is available, producing complex curved structures. Our results highlight the relevance of wetting in cell biology, and pave the way for the design of synthetic membrane-droplet based biomaterials and compartments with tunable properties.Competing Interest StatementThe authors have declared no competing interest.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2022-06-052022
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1101/2022.06.03.494704
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Title: bioRxiv
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Cold Spring Harbor : Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: 2022.06.03.494704 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ZDB: 2766415-6