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  Brain mechanism of Chinese character processing in rapid stream stimulation

Chen, J., Sun, D., Wang, P., Lv, Y., & Zhang, Y. (2022). Brain mechanism of Chinese character processing in rapid stream stimulation. Journal of Neurolinguistics, 63: 101084. doi:10.1016/j.jneuroling.2022.101084.

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 Creators:
Chen, Juan1, 2, 3, Author
Sun, Dan4, Author
Wang, Peng5, Author              
Lv, Yating1, 3, Author
Zhang, Ye1, 2, 3, Author
Affiliations:
1Center for Cognition and Brain Disorders, Affiliated Hospital of Hangzhou Normal University, China, ou_persistent22              
2TMS Center, Affiliated Hospital of Hangzhou Normal University, China, ou_persistent22              
3Zhejiang Key Laboratory for Research in Assessment of Cognitive Impairments, Hangzhou, China, ou_persistent22              
4Department of Psychology, Utrecht University, the Netherlands, ou_persistent22              
5Methods and Development Group Brain Networks, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_2205650              

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Free keywords: Masking effect; Lexicality; Middle occipital gyrus; Rapid stream stimulation (RSS); Character likeness
 Abstract: In visual masking, the visibility of a fleetingly presented visual target is disrupted by the presentation of an additional image, the mask, shortly before or after the target. Rapid stream stimulation (RSS) is a masking paradigm that is frequently used in character processing. Although neuroimaging studies have examined lexicality in terms of RSS, the mechanism underlying character masking has not been investigated. To resolve this issue, we investigated the neural basis of masking effects in lexicality using a two-way factorial design in a 3T-fMRI with masking (mask condition: masked versus unmasked) and target stimulus (character likeness: real-, pseudo-, non-characters) as factors. We found that brain activity in the left middle occipital gyrus (MOG) and lingual gyrus was strongest in the unmasked condition in RSS. Analysis of psychophysiological interactions revealed diverse patterns of functional connectivity in the two conditions, with stronger functional connectivity of the left MOG to the left fusiform gyrus and the right posterior cingulate cortex, suggesting the involvement of lexical processing of familiar characters. Together, these findings of activation and connectivity patterns indicated that masking in RSS reduced the visibility of characters by suppressing activity in the occipital cortex and reduced connectivity in both orthographical and attention networks.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2022-04-032021-06-012022-04-032022-04-132022-08
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.jneuroling.2022.101084
 Degree: -

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Title: Journal of Neurolinguistics
  Other : J. Neurolinguist.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Tokyo : Pergamon
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 63 Sequence Number: 101084 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 0911-6044
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954926241467